Oscars: ‘Gone Girl’ Composer Trent Reznor Reveals How He Gets Into David Fincher’s Head ... The Relationship Between Globe-nominated Musical or Comedies and Best Picture Oscar Noms ... Oscars: Is ‘Snowpiercer’ Actress Tilda Swinton Being Underestimated? ... SAG-Globes Noms: Is Jennifer Aniston In and Laura Dern Out for Oscar Nod? Not So Fast ... Palm Springs Film Fest: Oscar Hopeful ‘Selma’ to Open Academy-Favorite Gathering ... A Look at Female-directed Documentaries at the Oscars ... ‘Begin Again’ Song “Lost Stars” Rebounds From Globes Snub, Finds ‘Voice’ ... Santa Barbara Film Fest: Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones to Share Honor ...
Countdown to Oscars

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Oscars: ‘Gone Girl’ Composer Trent Reznor Reveals How He Gets Into David Fincher’s Head


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

A version of this story first appeared in the Jan. 9 issue of The Hollywood Reporter.

“Is it good? I’m not sure, but I know I worked my ass off,” Trent Reznor, the Nine Inch Nails frontman/Oscar-winning film composer told me of his latest score — the one that he and Atticus Ross put together for David Fincher’s smash-hit Gone Girl — when we sat down for an hour-long conversation a few weeks ago in Beverly Hills.

It took a while for me to accept that the person sitting across from me — a clean-cut, soft-spoken and polite family man just months shy of his 50th birthday — is the same one behind NIN, the post-punk “industrial rock” band that he founded in 1988. Ever since, the band has churned out a constant flow of hit songs like “Closer” and “Something I Can Never Have” — the sort of music that my generation grew up listening to when we were brooding or wanted to piss off our parents — en route to more than 20 million album sales worldwide, two Grammys and coming very close, this year, to earning an induction into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

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Wednesday, December 17, 2014

The Relationship Between Globe-nominated Musical or Comedies and Best Picture Oscar Noms


By Anjelica Oswald
Managing Editor

The 2015 Golden Globe nominees were announced Dec. 11,  with Alejandro G. Inarritu‘s Birdman leading the pack with seven nominations, including best picture — musical or comedy. Assuming Birdman will walk away with the win, what does that mean for its chances at the Oscars?

Well, since the musical or comedy category was created at the Globes in 1951, 51 of the films have been nominated for best picture at the Oscars and 13 have won.

Since 2001, 18 of the 70 films (26 percent) nominated for musical or comedy have received best picture nominations from the Academy and only two have won. Eight of the past 14 films (57 percent) to win for best musical/comedy at the Globes were also nominated for best picture at the Oscars. In contrast, 54 (77 percent) of the Globe-nominated dramas (including all 14 winners) have been nominated for best picture and 11 have won.

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Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Oscars: Is ‘Snowpiercer’ Actress Tilda Swinton Being Underestimated?


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

The holiday season is always a bit hectic, so it is understandable if you, like me until recently, failed to notice something that’s actually been brewing under the surface of the awards discussion for some time: namely, the grassroots support behind the best supporting actress Oscar candidacy of Tilda Swinton for her work in Bong Joon-ho’Snowpiercer.

On Monday, the 54-year-old’s performance as a gender-neutral politician in the dystopian RADiUS-TWC drama — which comes on top of other chameleonic work this year in Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel (a best ensemble SAG nominee) and Jim Jarmusch’s Only Lovers Left Alivewas nominated for the best supporting actress Critics’ Choice Award, a major profile boost.

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Tuesday, December 16, 2014

SAG-Globes Noms: Is Jennifer Aniston In and Laura Dern Out for Oscar Nod? Not So Fast


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

Far too often, people forget the major distinctions — in terms of size, origin and background — between the groups that determine the nominations for the Screen Actors Guild, Golden Globe and Academy Awards. SAG noms are determined by 2,100 randomly selected, U.S.-based members of SAG-AFTRA; Golden Globe noms are determined by about 90 non-American journalists; and Oscar noms are determined by approximately 6,000 people from all over the world who actually make movies.

Because many — in fact, most — Oscar-nominated performances do receive SAG and/or Globe noms en route to their Oscar noms, there is an assumption that performances that do not snag SAG and/or Globe noms instantly fall out of the running for an Oscar nom, and that performances that do snag SAG and/or Globe noms are locks for Oscar noms. A look at the last 12 years of results from all three groups, though, does not bear this out entirely.

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Tuesday, December 16, 2014

Palm Springs Film Fest: Oscar Hopeful ‘Selma’ to Open Academy-Favorite Gathering


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

A screening of Selma, the Golden Globe-nominated drama about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., will kick off the 26th annual Palm Springs International Film Festival on Jan. 2, the fest announced Tuesday. The opening-night slot — and a post-screening reception at the Palm Springs Art Museum at which talent from the film will be on hand — will help to shine a spotlight on the Paramount contender in front of a desert community in which hundreds of Academy members live or have second (or third) homes.

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Tuesday, December 16, 2014

A Look at Female-directed Documentaries at the Oscars


By Anjelica Oswald
Managing Editor 

This year’s Oscar race could make history with two possible best picture nominees directed by women — Ava DuVernay’s Selma and Angelina Jolie’s Unbroken. If both women are nominated for best director, that would also be a historical moment. But though these accomplishments in the narrative field are possible, more women directors are breaking into the documentary categories. Four of the 15 shortlisted documentaries feature women at the helm: Jennifer Grausman (co-directed with Sam Cullman and Mark Becker) with Art and Craft, Tia Lessin (co-directed with Carl Deal) with Citizen Koch, Laura Poitras with Citizenfour and Rory Kennedy with Last Days in Vietnam. Additionally, three of the eight shortlisted documentary shorts feature female directors: Ellen Goosenberg Kent with Crisis Hotline: Veterans Press 1, Aneta Kopacz with Joanna and Lucy Walker with The Lion’s Mouth Opens. More often than not, women directors tend to receive more nominations for their documentaries.

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Tuesday, December 16, 2014

‘Begin Again’ Song “Lost Stars” Rebounds From Globes Snub, Finds ‘Voice’


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

Fans of the best original song Oscar hopeful “Lost Stars” — which was co-written by Grammy winner Gregg Alexander (who I recently profiled) and performed in John Carney‘s charming indie Begin Again by Adam Levine and Keira Knightley — were down in the dumps last Thursday after it was left off the list of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association’s Golden Globe nominations.

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Monday, December 15, 2014

Santa Barbara Film Fest: Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones to Share Honor


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones, who play Stephen Hawking and Jane Hawking, respectively, in James Marsh’s The Theory of Everything — and both of whom have received SAG Award, Golden Globe Award and, on Monday, Critics’ Choice Award nominations — will jointly receive the Cinema Vanguard Award at the 2015 Santa Barbara International Film Festival, SBIFF announced on Monday. The honor will be presented at Santa Barbara’s historic Arlington Theatre on Jan. 29 as part of the fest’s 30thedition, which runs Jan. 27 through Feb. 7.

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Monday, December 15, 2014

Designers of Wes Anderson’s Distinguishable Aesthetic Have Yet to Land Oscar Noms


By Anjelica Oswald
Managing Editor 

From the color palette to the set design to the quirky characters, a Wes Anderson film is distinguishable for its unique aesthetic and each film is its own world.

Howie Kahn, for the Wall Street Journal, said Anderson “has honed a visual language all his own, refining his signature aesthetic in a way that enriches the emotional lives of his characters.”

The Hollywood Reporter’s Todd McCarthy also pointed out the distinguishable techniques in his review for The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014): “From the first moment, there’s no mistaking who made this film. Constant lateral tracks, push-ins, whip-pans, camera moves timed to dialogue, title cards, chapter headings, miniatures, use of stop-action, fetishization of clothing and props, absurdist predicaments — all the techniques Anderson has honed over the years — are used to pinpoint effect here.”

Though Anderson’s films have been recognized for original screenplay (2001’s The Royal Tenenbaums and 2012’s Moonrise Kingdom) and best animated feature (2009’s Fantastic Mr. Fox), none of his films have garnered nominations for best production design.

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Monday, December 15, 2014

Critics’ Choice Awards: Noms Give Hope to On-the-Bubble Oscar Hopefuls


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

I would venture a guess that a handful of longish-shot Oscar hopefuls — among them Unbroken’s Angelina Jolie, Gone Girl’s David Fincher, The Grand Budapest Hotel’Ralph Fiennes, Two Days, One Night’s Marion Cotillard, Inherent Vice’s Josh Brolin and Snowpiercer’s Tilda Swinton — could have quoted Dumb and Dumber’Jim Carrey on Monday morning when the Broadcast Film Critics Association announced its nominees for the 20th annual Critics’ Choice Movie Awards: “So you’re telling me there’s a chance!”

That’s because the BFCA smiled upon each of these individuals with major nominations, whereas few, if any, other major organizations have done the same.

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