How Often Is the Best Actress Category a Majority Of Women Age 50 Or Older? ... Oscars 2017: What Are Mel Gibson’s Chances of a Best Director Nomination For ‘Hacksaw Ridge’? ... ‘La La Land’ Has a Shot at Becoming the Most-Nominated Musical in Oscar History ... Feinberg Forecast: Oscar Standings During a Week of Purgatory ... Oscars 2017: All the Evidence That Martin Scorsese’s ‘Silence’ Will Be Completely Shut Out ... ‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast — Ryan Reynolds (‘Deadpool’) ... Oscars 2017: Will ‘Deadpool’ Be the First Superhero Film Nominated For Best Picture? ... ‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast — Vince Vaughn (‘Hacksaw Ridge’) ...
Countdown to Oscars

Friday, January 13, 2017

Does the Academy Have a Bias Toward Foreign-Language Films Based on World War II?

'Land of Mine' (Courtesy: Toronto International Film Festival)

‘Land of Mine’ (Courtesy: Toronto International Film Festival)

By: Carson Blackwelder
Managing Editor

If there’s one thing for certain about the foreign-language film category at the Oscars it’s that the Academy sure has a soft spot for films about World War II. Just this year alone there are three movies on the Academy’s shortlist that are set during that very tumultuous time — Denmark’s Land of Mine, Norway’s The King’s Choice, and Russia’s Paradise. How often has the Academy nominated or given the win to films based specifically during the World War II era?

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Thursday, January 12, 2017

Palm Springs Fest: Foreign-Language Directors on Their Movies’ Origins, Obstacles and Oscar Hopes

By: Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

No film festival showcases more films from around the world than the Palm Springs International Film Festival, the 28th edition of which began on Jan. 5 and runs through Jan. 16. This year, the fest’s lineup includes eight of the nine films that won spots on the Academy’s shortlist for the best foreign-language film Oscar (the only one of the nine that isn’t screening in Palm Springs is Australia’s Tanna). And with Oscar voting running from Jan. 5-13, many of those films’ directors visited the desert to be present for their films’ screenings — and, on Monday night, to participate on the “Eyes on the Prize” panel, which I moderated for the third consecutive year.

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Thursday, January 12, 2017

‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast — Viggo Mortensen (‘Captain Fantastic’)

Viggo Mortensen (Courtesy: Mar del Plata Film Festival)

Viggo Mortensen (Courtesy: Mar del Plata Film Festival)

By: Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

“It’s very unusual, first of all, to find an original story, a screenplay, as well written as Captain Fantastic,” says that film’s lead actor Viggo Mortensen as we sit down at the offices of The Hollywood Reporter to record an episode of THR‘s ‘Awards Chatter’ podcast. “It’s even more unusual for the movie to be as good as that script. And it’s even more unusual for that movie to be supported and be around and have such good word-of-mouth and for that to mean something months and months later. It’s very unusual. I’ve been around long enough to see that that doesn’t usually happen, so I’m very happy about that.”

Mortensen, 58, who is best known for playing Aragorn in the blockbuster Lord of the Rings trilogy (2001-2003), does some of the best work of his 32-year film career in Matt Ross‘ 2016 dramedy, which premiered last year at Sundance and brought Ross the best director prize at Cannes’ Un Certain Regard sidebar. In the film, he plays a former college professor raising his six kids off the grid in the Pacific Northwest, and for it he was nominated for the best actor (drama) Golden Globe Award and is nominated for the best actor SAG, BAFTA and Spirit awards. Additionally, the entire principal cast of Captain Fantastic is nominated for the best ensemble SAG Award. “That’s the one that made me the happiest,” he says. “When I heard that, I was jumping — and they were, too!”

(Click below to listen to this episode or here to access all of our 100+ episodes via iTunes. Past guests includeSteven Spielberg, Meryl Streep, Eddie Murphy, Lady Gaga, Robert De Niro, Amy Schumer, Will Smith, Jennifer Lopez,Louis C.K., Kristen Stewart, Harvey Weinstein, Sally Field, Jerry Seinfeld, Jane Fonda, Tyler Perry, Kate Winslet,Michael Moore, Helen Mirren, J.J. Abrams, Taraji P. Henson, Warren Beatty, Kate Beckinsale, Michael Eisner, Brie Larson, Sting, Natalie Portman, RuPaul, Sheila Nevins, Justin Timberlake, Nicole Kidman and Denzel Washington.)

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Thursday, January 12, 2017

DGA Nominations: ‘Lion’ Roars, ‘Birth of a Nation’ Reborn, ‘Deadpool’ Stays Alive

Garth Davis on the set of 'Lion' (Courtesy: Mark Rogers/ Long Way Home Productions)

Garth Davis on the set of ‘Lion’ (Courtesy: Mark Rogers/ Long Way Home Productions)

By: Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

Lion roared. The Birth of a Nation was reborn. And Deadpool stayed alive. I’m referring, of course, to Thursday morning’s announcement, by the Directors Guild of America, of the nominees for the 69th edition of the DGA Awards.

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Thursday, January 12, 2017

Isabelle Huppert May Receive First-Ever Oscar Nomination — Other Greats Who Also Have Zero

Isabelle Huppert (Courtesy: Tristan Fewings/Getty Images)

Isabelle Huppert (Courtesy: Tristan Fewings/Getty Images)

By: Carson Blackwelder
Managing Editor

The best actress Oscar race might seem like a showdown between La La Land’s Emma Stone and Jackie’s Natalie Portman, but Elle’s Isabelle Huppert is proving to be quite the upset. Should Huppert actually snag an Oscar nomination this year, shockingly it would be a first for the French thespian. If Huppert has flown under the Academy’s radar, who else out there is considered the best of the best and hasn’t had a chance to win Hollywood’s biggest award?

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Wednesday, January 11, 2017

‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast — Burt Bacharach (‘Po’)

Burt Bacharach (Courtesy: Michael Kovac/FilmMagic)

Burt Bacharach (Courtesy: Michael Kovac/FilmMagic)

By: Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

“It’s sort of what I’m supposed to do,” says the legendary songwriter/composer Burt Bacharach — a man who has written the music for 48 Top 10 hits, including nine that reached the top of the charts, and who has won eight Grammys, three Oscars and the Library of Congress’ 2011 Gershwin Prize for Popular Song — as we sit down in his Pacific Palisades piano room to record an episode of The Hollywood Reporter‘s ‘Awards Chatter’ podcast, and I ask him what keeps him working at the age of 88. “Sometimes I have to force it,” he admits. “But it’s what I’ve done. Even if I don’t write anything any good, just let me keep my fingers wet.”

Bacharach certainly has kept his fingers wet, of late: in 2016, for John Asher’s Po, an indie drama about a father with a child who is afflicted with autism — a dynamic Bacharach personally has experienced — he wrote “Dancing with Your Shadow,” his first original song for a film since “Walking Tall” for 1999’s Stuart Little, and his first original score for a film since 2000’s Isn’t She Lovely. Either or both could end up extending his already incredible Oscar resume: between the song and score categories, he has been nominated six times, and won three.

(Click below to listen to this episode or here to access all of our 100+ episodes via iTunes. Past guests include Steven Spielberg, Meryl Streep, Eddie Murphy, Lady Gaga, Robert De Niro, Amy Schumer, Will Smith, Jennifer LopezLouis C.K., Kristen Stewart, Harvey Weinstein, Sally Field, Jerry Seinfeld, Jane Fonda, Tyler Perry, Kate WinsletMichael Moore, Helen Mirren, J.J. Abrams, Taraji P. Henson, Warren Beatty, Kate Beckinsale, Michael Eisner, Brie Larson, Sting, Natalie Portman, RuPaul, Sheila Nevins, Justin Timberlake, Nicole Kidman and Denzel Washington.)

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Wednesday, January 11, 2017

TCM Film Fest: Peter Bogdanovich Will Be Among Special Guests (Exclusive)

Peter Bogdanovich (Courtesy: Tommaso Boddi/Getty)

Peter Bogdanovich (Courtesy: Tommaso Boddi/Getty)

By: Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

Oscar nominees Peter Bogdanovich and Genevieve Bujold will be among the honored guests at the 8th TCM Classic Film Festival, The Hollywood Reporter has learned. The fest will take place in Hollywood April 6-9.

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Wednesday, January 11, 2017

Oscars 2017: Does ‘Moonlight’ Scoring National Society of Film Critics Top Prize Mean Best Picture Win Is Next?

'Moonlight' (Courtesy: David Bornfriend/A24)

‘Moonlight’ (Courtesy: David Bornfriend/A24)

By: Carson Blackwelder
Managing Editor

At this point it seems as though the best picture Oscar race has narrowed down to two films: awards magnet La La Land and underdog Moonlight. Both picked up major trophies at the Golden Globes — though La La Land totally dominated the night — and it’s almost as if we’re gearing up for an epic showdown. With the National Society of Film Critics honoring Moonlight as their best picture, does that indicate that the Academy will follow suit?

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Tuesday, January 10, 2017

‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast — J. Ralph (‘Jim: The James Foley Story’)

J. Ralph (Courtesy: Mark Abrahams)

J. Ralph (Courtesy: Mark Abrahams)

By: Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

“They’re all about these giant concepts — climate change, the war, autism, species extinction, globalization, one after the next,” says songwriter/composer J. Ralph of the documentaries to which he has contributed music over the years, as we sit down at his Malibu home to record an episode of THR‘s ‘Awards Chatter’ podcast. They have included several films that won the best documentary feature Oscar (2008’s Man on Wireand 2009’s The Cove) or were nominated for it (2012’s Hell and Back Again and 2014’s Virunga). However, 2016’s Jim: The James Foley Story, the most recent doc to which he lent his talents, is different. “This one was about one person,” he notes, namely the eponymous freelance American war correspondent who, in 2014, was killed in Syria while trying to bring attention to the humanitarian crisis occurring there. “I wanted to recognize and celebrate the beauty of this great man who risked his life and gave his life to help show the world the civilian casualties of war and the suffering that’s going on around the world.”

Ralph, 41, is the only individual who has received multiple Oscar noms for songs featured in documentaries: “Chasing Time” from 2013’s Chasing Ice and “Manta Ray” from 2015’s Racing Extinction (the latter of which he co-wrote with Anohni). This year, he may well extend that record with a third nom, for “The Empty Chair,” a song that he and three-time Oscar nominee Sting were moved to write for Jim‘s end-credits — free of charge — after seeing Brian Oakes‘ film about Foley’s life and death.

(Click below to listen to this episode or here to access all of our 100+ episodes via iTunes. Past guests include Steven Spielberg, Meryl Streep, Eddie Murphy, Lady Gaga, Robert De Niro, Amy Schumer, Will Smith, Jennifer LopezLouis C.K., Kristen Stewart, Harvey Weinstein, Sally Field, Jerry Seinfeld, Jane Fonda, Tyler Perry, Kate WinsletMichael Moore, Helen Mirren, J.J. Abrams, Taraji P. Henson, Warren Beatty, Kate Beckinsale, Michael Eisner, Brie Larson, Sting, Natalie Portman, RuPaul, Sheila Nevins, Justin Timberlake and Nicole Kidman.)

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Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Feinberg Forecast: Checking In Amid Oscar Nominations Voting

'Hidden Figures' (Courtesy: Hopper Stone/Twentieth Century Fox)

‘Hidden Figures’ (Courtesy: Hopper Stone/Twentieth Century Fox)

By: Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

The AFI honored its top 10 films, the Golden Globes were handed out and the WGA, BAFTA and the PGA all released their nominations, so THR’s awards columnist has adjusted his charts accordingly.

These projections are a reflection of Scott Feinberg’s personal impressions (from advance screenings), publicly available information (release dates, genres, talent rosters and teasers/trailers often offer valuable clues), historical considerations (how other films with similar pedigrees have resonated), precursor awards (some awards groups have historically correlated with the Academy more than others) and consultations with industry insiders (including fellow members of the press, awards strategists, filmmakers and awards voters).

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