Oscars 2017: All the Evidence That Martin Scorsese’s ‘Silence’ Will Be Completely Shut Out ... ‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast — Ryan Reynolds (‘Deadpool’) ... Oscars 2017: Will ‘Deadpool’ Be the First Superhero Film Nominated For Best Picture? ... ‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast — Vince Vaughn (‘Hacksaw Ridge’) ... LA Film Critics Association Awards: Big Night for ‘Moonlight,’ Other Indie Darlings ... Oscars 2017: Will #OscarsSoWhite End By Seeing Record Number of Non-White Wins in Acting Categories? ... Does the Academy Have a Bias Toward Foreign-Language Films Based on World War II? ... Palm Springs Fest: Foreign-Language Directors on Their Movies’ Origins, Obstacles and Oscar Hopes ...
Countdown to Oscars

Sunday, January 8, 2017

Oscars: With Voting Underway, Academy Members Say So Many Films, Too Little Time to See Them All

Oscar ballots now are in the hands of voters (Courtesy: Getty Images)

Oscar ballots now are in the hands of voters (Courtesy: Getty Images)

By: Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

Oscar nomination voting began Thursday, Jan. 5, and runs through next Friday, Jan. 13, so The Hollywood Reporter decided to check in with a cross-section of Academy members to see how it’s going and what they’re breaking for — and found that, above all else, many feel they simply do not have enough time to see all of the movies they’re supposed to see.

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Friday, January 6, 2017

AFI Awards: A Star-Studded Luncheon Celebrates 2016’s Top Films and TV Shows

Clint Eastwood and Denzel Washington at the AFI Awards luncheon (Courtesy: Michael Kovac/Getty Images)

Clint Eastwood and Denzel Washington at the AFI Awards luncheon (Courtesy: Michael Kovac/Getty)

By: Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

A spotlight shone on some of the best films and TV shows of 2016 as the American Film Institute, which is celebrating its 50th birthday this year, today hosted its 17th annual AFI Awards luncheon at Beverly Hills’ Four Seasons Hotel. The top 10 films and top 10 TV shows — as chosen by two AFI juries of artists, critics, scholars and AFI trustees — were celebrated, while O.J.: Made in America, Ezra Edelman‘s landmark documentary, was recognized as the recipient of a rare “special award.”

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Friday, January 6, 2017

Oscars: Why Los Angeles-Set ‘La La Land’ Could Benefit From a Home-Field Advantage

(Courtesy: Illustration by: Katie Carey)

(Courtesy: Illustration by: Katie Carey)

By: Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

Many of 2016’s highest-profile Oscar hopefuls are closely associated with a particular place. Moonlight = Miami. Patriots Day = Boston. Fences = Pittsburgh. Manchester by the Sea = New England. Loving= Virginia. Hell or High Water = Texas. Lion = India. Silence = Japan. And the list goes on. But does La La Land, Damien Chazelle‘s Los Angeles-set original musical, have a built-in home-field advantage, specifically because it is so closely associated with, well, La La Land?

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Friday, January 6, 2017

How Does ‘Jackie’ Composer Micachu Fit Into the Brief History of Women in the Best Original Score Category?

Micachu (Courtesy: Daniel Bergeron Photography)

Micachu (Courtesy: Daniel Bergeron Photography)

By: Carson Blackwelder
Managing Editor

When it comes to the world of composing for films, it’s most definitely a man’s world — but this year there’s one woman who is a part of the conversation: Mica Levi, a.k.a. Micachu. Let’s get to know the 29-year-old talent that is garnering Oscar attention this year for working on Jackie and see where this talent fits into Academy Awards history.

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Thursday, January 5, 2017

‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast — Denzel Washington (‘Fences’)

Denzel Washington (Courtesy: Franco Origlia/Getty Images)

Denzel Washington (Courtesy: Franco Origlia/Getty Images)

By: Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

“We’re all actors and we’re here to work” says Denzel Washington when I ask him, as we sit down to record an episode of The Hollywood Reporter‘s ‘Awards Chatter’ podcast, if the actor who plays his son in Fences, the new film that he directed and stars in, was intimidated by working with him. The 61-year-old is, of course, a trailblazer for actors of color: An A-list movie star, following in the footsteps of his mentor Sidney Poitier, he became one of the most bankable stars of all time, with a filmography collectively responsible for more than $3.6 billion in worldwide grosses and a consistent track record of excellent work, which has resulted in a Tony and two Oscars. He continues, “There’s no difference. He’s an actor. I’m an actor. I’m just a more popular actor right now, but there’s really no difference. All that ‘movie star’/’celebrity’ stuff is stuff they call you; that’s not what I am, that’s a label that I’m given. The only title I use is ‘Actor.'”

(Click below to listen to this episode or here to access all of our 100+ episodes via iTunes. Past guests include Steven Spielberg, Meryl Streep, Eddie Murphy, Lady Gaga, Robert De Niro, Amy Schumer, Will Smith, Jennifer LopezLouis C.K., Kristen Stewart, Harvey Weinstein, Sally Field, Jerry Seinfeld, Jane Fonda, Tyler Perry, Kate WinsletMichael Moore, Helen Mirren, J.J. Abrams, Taraji P. Henson, Warren Beatty, Kate Beckinsale, Michael Eisner, Brie Larson, Sting, Natalie Portman, RuPaul, Sheila Nevins, Justin Timberlake, Nicole Kidman and Michael Keaton.)

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Thursday, January 5, 2017

National Board of Review Awards: ‘Manchester by the Sea,’ Diversity and Trump the Talk of the Night

(Courtesy: Dimitrios Kambouris/WireImage)

(Courtesy: Dimitrios Kambouris/WireImage)

By: Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

It felt like representatives of Manchester by the Sea were presenting or accepting awards for almost all of the three-plus-hour National Board of Review’s 88th annual awards ceremony on Wednesday night at Cipriani 42nd Street. That’s partly because those who got up to the podium were a bit on the longwinded side, but also partly because so many of them got up to the podium: Kenneth Lonergan (accepted best film and best original screenplay), Casey Affleck (presented best original screenplay and accepted best actor), Lucas Hedges (accepted best breakthrough actor) and Matthew Broderick (presented best film). In other words, there was no question — and had been no question from the moment this year’s winners first were announced back on Nov. 29 — about which movie the NBR, a rather opaque organization comprised of roughly 130 “film enthusiasts,” loved the most in 2016.

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Thursday, January 5, 2017

Europe Is King in Best Foreign-Language Film Category — How Does the Rest of the World Stack Up?

By: Carson Blackwelder
Managing Editor

The greatest thing about the best foreign-language film category is the recognition of works from all around the world. Throughout the years, movies made outside the United States of America have gotten the recognition they deserve thanks to the implementation of this specific award. With the 2017 Oscars right around the corner, let’s take a look back at the distribution of nominations and wins across the seven continents that make up this big world we inhabit.

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Wednesday, January 4, 2017

WGA Awards: How Did ‘Deadpool’ Get a Nomination and What Does It Mean For the Oscars?

'Deadpool' (Courtesy: Joe Lederer/Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation)

‘Deadpool’ (Courtesy: Joe Lederer/Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation)

By: Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

The Writers Guild of America on Wednesday announced the nominees for its annual WGA Awards. Most of the usual suspects were nominated — La La Land, Moonlight, Manchester by the Sea, Hell or High Water and Loving, along with Arrival, Fences, Hidden Figures and Nocturnal Animals. But not all of them were nominated in the category in which you’d expect. And rather than competing against films like Hacksaw RidgeSilence, Lion or The Lobster, they instead found themselves in the company of the comic book adaptation Deadpool, about as much of a popcorn movie as one could imagine.

What, you may wonder, is going on here?

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Wednesday, January 4, 2017

New York Film Critics Circle Awards: Taking Aim at Donald Trump Amid the Prize-Giving

Barry Jenkins and Damien Chazelle (Courtesy: Mike Coppola/Getty Images, Jamie McCarthy/WireImage)

Barry Jenkins and Damien Chazelle (Courtesy: Mike Coppola/Getty Images, Jamie McCarthy/WireImage)

By: Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

Throughout the 82nd New York Film Critics Circle Awards, which took place Tuesday night at the Tao Downtown restaurant, the most frequent subject of critical ire was President-elect Donald J. TrumpDavid Edelstein of New York magazine, who chairs the critics’ group, opened the evening by saying its aim was to celebrate “a few of the good things that happened during the shit-show of a year we just had.” Later, The Daily Show host Trevor Noah, while presenting the best documentary award to O.J.: Made in America, cracked that he thought we’d learned from the O.J. Simpson trial — until Trump’s election in November, which he called “another bad decision based on fame and race.” And other presenters like Robert Klein, Jonathan Demme and Baz Luhrmann, as well as some of the honorees — who were originally announced back on Dec. 1 — joined the anti-Trump chorus.

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Wednesday, January 4, 2017

How Often Do Foreign-Language Films Score Screenwriting Oscar Nominations Or Wins?

'Toni Erdmann' (Courtesy: TIFF)

‘Toni Erdmann’ (Courtesy: TIFF)

By: Carson Blackwelder
Managing Editor

It’s not too often that foreign-language films get recognized for anything at the Oscars beyond the best foreign-language film category — but it does happen. And, believe it or not, it happens more for best original screenplay and best adapted screenplay than many other categories. A prime example of that is Toni Erdmann, Germany’s submission this year that is proving to be a cross-category threat, which could score a nomination — or a win — for its writing.

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