Ten Documentary Oscar Contenders That Debuted at Sundance ... Palm Springs Film Fest: Rosamund Pike Lands Breakthrough Honor for ‘Gone Girl’ ... Marion Cotillard’s Curious Career ... Watch Jennifer Aniston Confront Sam Worthington in ‘Cake’ (Exclusive Video) ... Levity is Rare in Oscar Nominees ... New Radicals’ Gregg Alexander Performs ‘You Get What You Give’ for First Time in 15 Years ... Palm Springs Film Fest: J.K. Simmons Nabs Spotlight Award for ‘Whiplash’ ... Three Oscar Contenders Head to Broadway ...
Countdown to Oscars

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Recent Visual Effects Winners at the Oscars Have Also Won for Cinematography

By Anjelica Oswald
Managing Editor

This summer’s Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, the sequel to 2011’s Rise of the Planet of the Apes, was released on Digital HD today and will be released on Blu-ray and DVD on Dec. 2. 20th Century Fox is pushing its cast, including Andy Serkis for his motion-capture performance as ape leader Caesar, for supporting actor nominations, but the film also has a serious shot at a nomination for visual effects. Rise of the Planet of the Apes garnered a nomination for visual effects at the 84th Academy Awards. Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar, which opened Nov. 5, is also a visual effects contender, but it is also a cinematography contender.

The nominees are chosen by specific branches of the Academy based on expertise, but voting is done by all the members. Most of the films nominated for cinematography differ from those nominated for visual effects. Looking at the 21st Century nominees in both categories, films haven’t historically been nominated in both categories, but since the 82nd Academy Awards, the winner of cinematography has also won for visual effects.

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Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Savannah Film Fest: Watch Eight Top Doc Filmmakers Discuss Their 2014 Oscar Contenders


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

There are just 11 days remaining before the Academy’s documentary branch must vote to determine which of 134 documentary features will make it onto a shortlist of 15 from which this year’s five Oscar nominees will be chosen. The general consensus of the dozens of doc-branch members with whom I’ve spoken at various events over the last couple of weeks —Rory Kennedy’s lunch at AOC in West Hollywood for Point and Shoot‘s Marshall Curry, Pierce Brosnan’s dinner at his Malibu home for Kennedy’s Last Days in Vietnam, etc. — is that this year’s doc race is as deep and competitive as any in memory.

That has been my sense, too, as I’ve made my way through a sizable chunk of the longlist, and it is why I was so delighted when the Savannah Film Festival offered to host me and eight documentary filmmakers at the SCAD Museum of Art’s 250-seat theater for a panel discussion about documentary filmmaking, in general, and some of this year’s “Docs to Watch,” as they termed their new festival sidebar, as part of which they screened the 2014 works of each of the documentarians.

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Monday, November 10, 2014

Few Actors Have Scored Original Song Nominations

By Anjelica Oswald
Managing Editor 

Since its premiere at Sundance, Richard Linklater’s Boyhood has been garnering Oscar buzz and rave reviews. The film could score nominations for best picture, director, actor and more, but after submitting three songs to the Academy for consideration in the best original song category, the film could add another nomination. Two of the songs were written by Ethan Hawke, who could garner a best supporting actor nomination for his portrayal of the father. If Hawke receives a best original song nomination for one of his songs, he will join a short list of actors who have scored nominations for songs since 1994.

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Sunday, November 9, 2014

Governors Awards: Top Contenders Celebrate Legends at Dress Rehearsal for Oscars


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

The Academy’s sixth annual Governors Awards was, like the five before it, as special a night as any on the Hollywood awards season calendar.

I refer to it as “special” because it was a beautifully orchestrated and moving ceremony (hat-tip to the evening’s producer Reginald Hudlin and Academy president Cheryl Boone Isaacs) celebrating four remarkable people: Golden Age actress Maureen O’Hara, prolific writer Jean-Claude Carriere and animation master Hayao Miyazaki received honorary Oscars, and 87-year-old actor/activistHarry Belafonte became only the 37th recipient of the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award.

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Sunday, November 9, 2014

Palm Springs Film Fest: Eddie Redmayne Lands Top Actor Honor for ‘Theory of Everything’


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

Eddie Redmayne, who has received raves — and whom I have long projected as the best actor Oscar frontrunner — for his portrayal of Stephen Hawking in James Marsh’s tear-jerking drama The Theory of Everything (which Focus Features is releasing in select theaters Friday), has been tapped for his first accolade of the season: he will receive the Palm Springs International Film Festival’s highest honor for a male actor, the Desert Palm Achievement Award, at the 26th annual PSIFF Awards Gala on Jan. 3.

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Friday, November 7, 2014

Three ‘Boyhood’ Songs, Including Two by Ethan Hawke, Enter Oscar Race (Exclusive)


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

As the Oscar race approaches the Thanksgiving break, with only a small handful of major awards hopefuls that haven’t yet screened, IFC Films’ summer release Boyhood continues to look like the film to beat. It is almost impossible to imagine that the immensely popular indie, which was famously shot over 12 years, won’t show up in the categories of best picture, best director (Richard Linklater), best supporting actor (Ethan Hawke, who is having an incredible year), best supporting actress (Patricia Arquette), best original screenplay (Linklater) and best film editing (Sandra Adair) — and, as I’ve written before, I wouldn’t rule out the possibility of it scoring a nom for best actor (Ellar Coltrane), as well.

Today, The Hollywood Reporter can exclusively report that three more possible noms have opened up for Boyhood. That’s because its filmmakers have officially submitted to the Academy’s music branch three songs featured in the film for consideration in the best original song category: “Split the Difference” (written by Hawke, performed by Hawke and Charlie Sexton); “Ryan’s Song” (written by Hawke, performed by Hawke, Coltrane, Lorelei Linklater and Jennifer Tooley); and “Summer Noon” (written by Jeff Tweedy, performed by Tweedy).

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Friday, November 7, 2014

‘Finding Vivian Maier’ Could Join the Six Photography-Related Docs to Score Oscar Noms


By Anjelica Oswald
Managing Editor 

Directed by John Maloof and Charlie Siskel, Finding Vivian Maier documents Maloof’s journey to discover more about Vivian Maier after purchasing a box of her negatives in 2007. He began the search a few years later, after he realized the negatives consisted of some of the best undeveloped street photography of the 20th century. After some searching, it was revealed that Maier was a career-nanny who had died in 2009.

Since the documentary is in serious contention for a best documentary feature Oscar, we thought we’d check to see how many other photography-related films have managed to resonate with the Academy’s documentary branch and land a nomination in the same category. We found six.

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Thursday, November 6, 2014

Oscar Hopeful Jennifer Aniston Looks Grim In New ‘Cake’ Poster (Exclusive)


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

The latest look at the film Cake is showcased in the new poster, exclusively hosted by The Hollywood Reporter.

The drama, a possible Oscar vehicle for Jennifer Aniston, had its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September, where it received a standing ovation. It will have an awards-qualifying run next month, and will then expand into more theaters in January.

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Thursday, November 6, 2014

Hollywood Film Awards: Craft, International Winners Unveiled


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

The 18th annual Hollywood Film Awards will be the first ever televised when CBS airs it on Nov. 14. There has been some speculation that the event’s move to network TV will result in it dropping its crafts prizes altogether — after all, they would take up a significant chunk of the two-hour broadcast and aren’t exactly ratings magnets — but that will not be the case.

Instead, the crafts prizes — which honor work in cinematography, visual effects, film composing, costume design, film editing, production design, sound and makeup/hairstyling, and have been a staple of the event since its inception — will be presented prior to the start of the live broadcast and will then be acknowledged in “bumpers” leading into commercials (as has also happened with the Critics’ Choice Awards).

 

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Thursday, November 6, 2014

Sophia Loren on Refusing to Get a Nose Job Early in Her Career: “When I Believe in Something, It’s Like War”


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

Sophia Loren is the face of this year’s AFI Fest: A dazzling photo of the actress, taken in 1965, beckons from this year’s event poster. And on Nov. 12, the festival will hold a special tribute to Loren, 80, that will include a screening of one of her most memorable movies, 1964’s Marriage Italian Style, in which she played opposite her frequent co-star Marcello Mastroianni under the direction of Vittorio De Sica; a presentation of the short film The Human Voice, directed by Edoardo Ponti, one of her two sons by her late husband, producer Carlo Ponti; and a conversation with the actress, who, says festival director Jacqueline Lyanga, is still “so beautiful, radiant and glamorous.” Speaking by phone from her home in Geneva, Loren says of her latest honor: “It gives me a kind of security and the sense that maybe what I’ve done in my career I did in a good way.”

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