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Posts Tagged ‘Clint Eastwood’

Wednesday January 29th, 2014

BAFTA Acting Nominations: How Much Can They Influence The Oscar Race?


By Mark Pinkert
Contributor

As the BAFTA awards quickly approach, one camp of Oscar hopefuls that ought to be a bit concerned is that of Dallas Buyers Club, which received no BAFTA acting nominations (nor any competitive or technical nominations). As it stood, before the BAFTA announcements were made earlier this month, both Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto were serious contenders for the Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor Oscars, respectively. It is likely that they still are, but how much will their BAFTA snubs hurt them in the Oscar race?

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Saturday January 11th, 2014

The Academy Awards: No Country for Old Men, or Women?


By Mark Pinkert
Contributor

At the ripe age of 79, Judi Dench could become the second oldest woman to win the Academy Award for Best Actress. She’s a likely nominee by way of Philomena (2013), a British comedy-drama in which Philomena Lee (Dench) pairs up with an out-of-work journalist, Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan), to find the son she was forced to give up 50 years earlier. An Academy win would make Dench the second oldest Best Actress behind only Jessica Tandy, who won the award at the age of 80 as Mrs. Daisy Werthan in Driving Miss Daisy (1989), and only the third Best Actress to receive the award while over the age of 65 (Katharine Hepburn won for On Golden Pond (1981) when she was 74 years old).

Dench–known more for her icy, matriarchal roles–is illuminated and humorous in Philomena, and she handles this role with great dexterity. But while she’s an almost guaranteed Best Actress nom, the film itself seems to be on the Best Picture bubble, and will have a tough time squeezing past the likes of Inside Llewyn Davis or Dallas Buyers Club. This despite the fact that the Academy voting body is notoriously known for being very old and very white, and often voting that way.

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Tuesday December 31st, 2013

David O. Russell’s Hot Streak

By Mark Pinkert
Contributor

If David O. Russell gets nominated for Best Director this year, he will have accomplished something that Martin Scorsese, Woody Allen, Alfred Hitchcock, Francis Ford Coppola and many other great directors have not–that is, to earn three Best Director nominations in the span of only four years. In fact, only eleven other directors have been on comparable hot streaks in Academy Award history, and only one of those streaks (by Clint Eastwood) has occurred after 1960. (See below for reference.)

This is not a comparison of overall quality or career prolificity (not many can bout with Scorsese, Allen, Hitchcock and Coppola in those categories), but merely a tribute to Russell’s ultra-concentrated efforts in the past four years and a recognition of the difficulty of this feat. It’s also a relevant because it might shed some light on previous Oscar trends and on what we can expect at the 86th Oscars.

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Friday November 22nd, 2013

Race, Gender, and Sexuality at the Oscars, Part II

By Mark Pinkert
Contributor

This is the second article in a three-part series.

Earlier this month, the acclaimed writer/producer/director Joss Whedon spoke at an Equality Now benefit dinner and suggested that the word “feminism” be removed from the English lexicon. According to Mr. Whedon, the word is problematic because it assumes that gender equality is not the “natural state” but something that needs to be achieved. Though several self-purported feminist bloggers have criticized this idea, Whedon’s speech does raise some interesting questions about how prejudice can hide away in the depths of language and rhetoric.

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Friday February 1st, 2013

The Top 10 Actors Turned Directors

By Joey Magidson
Film Contributor

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I’ve always had a soft spot for films that are directed by actors. In one of my recent pieces, I spoke about how the Academy looks at actors who direct. Now, I’ll be continuing my interest by focusing in on which of these multi-hyphenates are the best at what they do.

By and large, the films that actors make when they choose directorial projects have some sort of significance for them or at least play to their strengths, so disasters are few and far between. This makes it a lot of fun to celebrate the best of the bunch, since I’m able to draw from a larger pool than you normally can when looking at one particular type of filmmaker.

I take some comfort in knowing that most films directed by actors tend to be at least decent, if not better. I see almost 300 movies in a given year (in 2012 I saw 290 in total), so I undoubtedly see a lot of garbage to go along with the gems, but the flicks that actor-directors put out almost never turn out terrible.

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Monday January 28th, 2013

With Affleck A New Example, How Does The Academy Treat Films Directed By Actors?

By Joey Magidson
Film Contributor

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No matter how we talk about the Oscar race right now, the discussion is fed through the prism of both the Best Picture candidacy of Argo and the Best Director snub of Ben Affleck. Especially now that the Producers Guild crowned Argo with their top prize over the weekend and the Screen Actors Guild did the same just hours ago, all roads of discussion go through that flick and Affleck.

One angle that I haven’t really discussed much yet is the fact that Affleck is still primarily an actor transitioning to being a director as well. This is only his third film, and while he’s seen Oscar nominations for supporting roles in both of his films (Amy Ryan for Gone Baby Gone and Jeremy Renner for The Town), no wins have come for any of his directorial outings.

This time around, Argo was supposed to be the movie that got him over the hump. In one regard, it did, since the film is nominated for seven Academy Awards and is in serious contention to win at least three or four of them. Obviously, the one place it’s notoriously not competing in is the Best Director category. Affleck was looked at as perhaps the leader of the pack for much of the season, but he wound up out in the cold on nomination morning.

The snub begs the question of whether the Academy truly has the soft spot for films directed by actors that some presume exists. Did Argo get the love it did because of — or in spite of — the admiration voters had for Affleck’s efforts?

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Monday October 1st, 2012

Hollywood Film Awards to Honor Amy Adams, ‘Zero Dark Thirty’ Editor, and ‘Anna Karenina’ Production Designer

By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

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The Hollywood Reporter has learned that at the 16th annual Hollywood Film Awards — the first awards show of the 2012 Oscar season — Amy Adams, a three-time best supporting actress Oscar nominee who is now in serious contention for her fourth nom in the category for Paul Thomas Anderson‘s The Master or Walter Salles‘s On the Road or Clint Eastwood‘s Trouble with the Curve, will receive the Hollywood Supporting Actress Award; Dylan Tichenor, A.C.E., a best film editing Oscar nominee five years ago who is now in serious contention for his second nom in the category for Kathryn Bigelow‘s Zero Dark Thirty, will receive the Hollywood Editor Award; and Sarah Greenwood, A.D.G., a three-time best art direction Oscar nominee who is now in contention for her fourth nom in the category (which has been renamed best production design) for Anna Karenina, will receive the Hollywood Production Designer Award. The prizes will be presented at a gala ceremony at the Beverly Hilton on Oct. 22.

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Thursday September 13th, 2012

Toronto 2012: Naomi Watts Reflects On a Career That Once Seemed ‘Impossible’ (Video)

By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

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TORONTO — Earlier this week, just hours before the Toronto International Film Festival world premiere of Juan Antonio Bayona‘s The Impossible — a harrowing film based on the true story of one British family’s 2004 trip to a beach resort in Thailand, where they were torn about from each other when a massive tsunami engulfed the nation’s coastline — I had the opportunity to spend some time with the star of the heartwrenching drama, Oscar nominee Naomi Watts.

The 43-year-old British-born, Aussie-raised actress and I talked about her early struggles to find work that almost prompted her to quit the profession (it took her 10 years before she “made it”); the film that changed the course of her career and made her one of the most respected and sought-after actresses of her generation, David Lynch‘s Mulholland Dr. (“That’s sort of the marking point of my career… I couldn’t get a handshake before”); and her eerily consistent streak of appearing in at least one noteworthy film almost every year since: Gore Verbinski‘s The Ring (2002), Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu‘s 21 Grams (2003), David O. Russell‘s I Heart Huckabees (2004), Peter Jackson‘s King Kong (2005), John Curran‘s The Painted Veil (2006), David Cronenberg‘s Eastern Promises (2007), Rodrigo Garcia‘s Mother and Child (2009), Doug Liman‘s Fair Game (2010), and Clint Eastwood‘s J. Edgar (2011).

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Sunday February 19th, 2012

Oscar-Nominated ‘Midnight in Paris’ Art Director Anne Seibel on Reviving the Past (Audio)

This week, I had the pleasure of interviewing Anne Seibel, a French production designer whose creative talents and ability to speak English have made her “the go-to girl” for Hollywood productions that shoot in France — her credits include Steven Spielberg’s Munich (2005), Sofia Coppola’s Marie Antoinette (2006), Clint Eastwood’s Hereafter (2010) — and whose work on one, Woody Allen’s Midnight in Paris, has now earned her a trip to the Oscars on Feb. 26 as a nominee for the best art direction Oscar. (I encourage you to check out the audio of our full conversation at the top of this post.)

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Sunday February 12th, 2012

BAFTA Awards Offers Some Clues, Some Decoys About Oscar Race (Analysis)

The British Academy of Film and Television Arts handed out its 65th annual BAFTA Awards this afternoon across the pond, and many of the same folks who will congregate at the Oscars two weeks from today were in attendance. Of course, the question now on all of their minds — and ours — is whether or not the American Academy will annoint the same major winners as the British Academy: The Artist for best picture, Michel Hazanavicius (The Artist) for best director; Jean Dujardin (The Artist) for best actor; Meryl Streep (The Iron Lady) for best actress; Christopher Plummer (Beginners) for best supporting actor; and Octavia Spencer (The Help) for best supporting actress.

Here’s my take…

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