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Posts Tagged ‘Clint Eastwood’

Monday December 8th, 2014

Clint Eastwood: “I Was Against Going Into the War in Iraq”


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

“I was against going into the war in Iraq since I figured we would probably trip over ourselves in some way,” Clint Eastwood revealed after screening his new film American Sniper on Saturday at the Academy of Motion Picture Artists and Sciences’ Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills.

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Monday December 8th, 2014

Bradley Cooper on How He Brought ‘American Sniper’ to the Screen and ‘The Elephant Man’ to Broadway


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

Allow me to take a moment to talk about Bradley Cooper.

Why? Because the 39-year-old star of Clint Eastwood’s American Sniper — a harrowing portrait of the life of Chris Kyle, a Navy SEAL who was the most effective American sniper during the Iraq War, which Warner Bros. will release on Dec. 25 — is not available to talk much about himself at the moment, being in the midst of starring in The Elephant Man eight times a week on Broadway. (The production officially opened Sunday night at the Booth Theatre, where its original incarnation premiered 35 years ago, and where I caught a preview performance last week. THR‘s theater critic David Rooney writes that Cooper gives a performance “staggering in its physical discipline, its piercing emotional transparency and, most surprisingly, its restraint.”)

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Wednesday November 12th, 2014

AFI Fest: Oscar Race Gets Adrenaline Shot From ‘Selma,’ ‘American Sniper’ Premieres


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

Talk about a double feature! On Tuesday night, two highly anticipated Oscar hopefuls — Ava DuVernay’s Selma (Paramount) and Clint Eastwood’s American Sniper (Warner Bros.) — had back-to-back world premieres at Hollywood’s Egyptian Theatre as part of AFI Fest.

And while the films each deserved nights of their own, those who were lucky enough to catch both witnessed something that has been strangely uncommon this season: projects that actually lived up to great expectations.

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Thursday September 18th, 2014

More Stars are Making the Transition from Actor to Director


By Anjelica Oswald
Managing Editor

For some actors, it is a natural progression to move from using their talents in front of the camera to testing their skills behind it. Though actors have been making the transition for years, 2013 was a particular popular year for actors-turned-directors. Among some of the releases throughout the year were Ben Stiller‘s The Secret Life of Walter Mitty and Lake Bell’s In A World…, her directorial debut. The 2013 Toronto International Film Festival was the directorial launching pad of Jason Bateman’s Bad Words and Mike Myers’ Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon, and the festival also screened Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s directorial debut Don Jon and Ralph FiennesThe Invisible Woman.

Though many of these actors’ projects may not garner any awards, there are some that make their way to the Oscars, such as Ben Affleck’s Argo (2012), which won the best picture Oscar and was his third film as director. 2014 also has its fair share of actors-turned-directors’ projects.

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Wednesday January 29th, 2014

BAFTA Acting Nominations: How Much Can They Influence The Oscar Race?


By Mark Pinkert
Contributor

As the BAFTA awards quickly approach, one camp of Oscar hopefuls that ought to be a bit concerned is that of Dallas Buyers Club, which received no BAFTA acting nominations (nor any competitive or technical nominations). As it stood, before the BAFTA announcements were made earlier this month, both Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto were serious contenders for the Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor Oscars, respectively. It is likely that they still are, but how much will their BAFTA snubs hurt them in the Oscar race?

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Saturday January 11th, 2014

The Academy Awards: No Country for Old Men, or Women?


By Mark Pinkert
Contributor

At the ripe age of 79, Judi Dench could become the second oldest woman to win the Academy Award for Best Actress. She’s a likely nominee by way of Philomena (2013), a British comedy-drama in which Philomena Lee (Dench) pairs up with an out-of-work journalist, Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan), to find the son she was forced to give up 50 years earlier. An Academy win would make Dench the second oldest Best Actress behind only Jessica Tandy, who won the award at the age of 80 as Mrs. Daisy Werthan in Driving Miss Daisy (1989), and only the third Best Actress to receive the award while over the age of 65 (Katharine Hepburn won for On Golden Pond (1981) when she was 74 years old).

Dench–known more for her icy, matriarchal roles–is illuminated and humorous in Philomena, and she handles this role with great dexterity. But while she’s an almost guaranteed Best Actress nom, the film itself seems to be on the Best Picture bubble, and will have a tough time squeezing past the likes of Inside Llewyn Davis or Dallas Buyers Club. This despite the fact that the Academy voting body is notoriously known for being very old and very white, and often voting that way.

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Tuesday December 31st, 2013

David O. Russell’s Hot Streak

By Mark Pinkert
Contributor

If David O. Russell gets nominated for Best Director this year, he will have accomplished something that Martin Scorsese, Woody Allen, Alfred Hitchcock, Francis Ford Coppola and many other great directors have not–that is, to earn three Best Director nominations in the span of only four years. In fact, only eleven other directors have been on comparable hot streaks in Academy Award history, and only one of those streaks (by Clint Eastwood) has occurred after 1960. (See below for reference.)

This is not a comparison of overall quality or career prolificity (not many can bout with Scorsese, Allen, Hitchcock and Coppola in those categories), but merely a tribute to Russell’s ultra-concentrated efforts in the past four years and a recognition of the difficulty of this feat. It’s also a relevant because it might shed some light on previous Oscar trends and on what we can expect at the 86th Oscars.

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Friday November 22nd, 2013

Race, Gender, and Sexuality at the Oscars, Part II

By Mark Pinkert
Contributor

This is the second article in a three-part series.

Earlier this month, the acclaimed writer/producer/director Joss Whedon spoke at an Equality Now benefit dinner and suggested that the word “feminism” be removed from the English lexicon. According to Mr. Whedon, the word is problematic because it assumes that gender equality is not the “natural state” but something that needs to be achieved. Though several self-purported feminist bloggers have criticized this idea, Whedon’s speech does raise some interesting questions about how prejudice can hide away in the depths of language and rhetoric.

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Friday February 1st, 2013

The Top 10 Actors Turned Directors

By Joey Magidson
Film Contributor

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I’ve always had a soft spot for films that are directed by actors. In one of my recent pieces, I spoke about how the Academy looks at actors who direct. Now, I’ll be continuing my interest by focusing in on which of these multi-hyphenates are the best at what they do.

By and large, the films that actors make when they choose directorial projects have some sort of significance for them or at least play to their strengths, so disasters are few and far between. This makes it a lot of fun to celebrate the best of the bunch, since I’m able to draw from a larger pool than you normally can when looking at one particular type of filmmaker.

I take some comfort in knowing that most films directed by actors tend to be at least decent, if not better. I see almost 300 movies in a given year (in 2012 I saw 290 in total), so I undoubtedly see a lot of garbage to go along with the gems, but the flicks that actor-directors put out almost never turn out terrible.

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Monday January 28th, 2013

With Affleck A New Example, How Does The Academy Treat Films Directed By Actors?

By Joey Magidson
Film Contributor

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No matter how we talk about the Oscar race right now, the discussion is fed through the prism of both the Best Picture candidacy of Argo and the Best Director snub of Ben Affleck. Especially now that the Producers Guild crowned Argo with their top prize over the weekend and the Screen Actors Guild did the same just hours ago, all roads of discussion go through that flick and Affleck.

One angle that I haven’t really discussed much yet is the fact that Affleck is still primarily an actor transitioning to being a director as well. This is only his third film, and while he’s seen Oscar nominations for supporting roles in both of his films (Amy Ryan for Gone Baby Gone and Jeremy Renner for The Town), no wins have come for any of his directorial outings.

This time around, Argo was supposed to be the movie that got him over the hump. In one regard, it did, since the film is nominated for seven Academy Awards and is in serious contention to win at least three or four of them. Obviously, the one place it’s notoriously not competing in is the Best Director category. Affleck was looked at as perhaps the leader of the pack for much of the season, but he wound up out in the cold on nomination morning.

The snub begs the question of whether the Academy truly has the soft spot for films directed by actors that some presume exists. Did Argo get the love it did because of — or in spite of — the admiration voters had for Affleck’s efforts?

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