‘Bridge of Spies’: Complicated Relationship Between Steven Spielberg and Academy ... The Awards Pundits on ‘Bridge of Spies,’ Early Frontrunners and Pseudoevents October 05, 2015 4:03pm PT by Scott Feinberg The Awards Pundits on ‘Bridge of Spies,’ Early Frontrunners and Pseudoevents ... Hollywood Film Awards: Honors Going to ‘Furious 7,’ ‘Amy,’ More (Exclusive) ... Jane Fonda Makes the Most of Limited Screen Time in ‘Youth’, Hopes to Join Past Supporting Actress Noms with Short Performances ... Santa Barbara Film Fest: Jane Fonda Feted with Kirk Douglas Award ... ‘The Walk’ Hopes to Join Past 3D Films Nominated for Best Picture ... Hollywood Film Awards: Robert De Niro to Receive Career Achievement Honor (Exclusive) ... Where Your Film is Set May Be an Issue for Oscar Hopefuls ...
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Posts Tagged ‘Danny Boyle’

Friday September 18th, 2015

The 5 TIFF Audience Award Winners That Went On to Win Best Picture

By Patrick Shanley
Managing Editor

Winning the audience award at the Toronto International Film Festival is a major feather in the cap for any film — and, for many, the launching pad for even loftier goals. Indeed, five went on to win best picture at the Academy Awards.

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Friday September 11th, 2015

Scott Feinberg’s ‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast: ‘Steve Jobs’ Danny Boyle, Kate Winslet and Seth Rogen

Thursday January 29th, 2015

Damien Chazelle or Paul Thomas Anderson Could Become Fifth Adapted Screenplay Winner to Also Direct the Film

By Anjelica Oswald
Managing Editor 

Adapted screenplay nominees Damien Chazelle and Paul Thomas Anderson have been nominated for films that they also directed.

Chazelle’s Whiplash, about an aspiring jazz drummer and his sadistic instructor, is his second feature film and is adapted from a short film of the same name that he also wrote and directed. The short won the jury award for short films at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival. Whiplash was nominated for four other awards, including best picture.

Anderson received his second adapted screenplay nomination for Inherent Vice, based on Thomas Pynchon’s novel of the same name. The film was also nominated for costume design. Anderson previously received an adapted screenplay nomination for 2007’s There Will Be Blood, which he also directed. He received a best director nomination, and the film was nominated for best picture.

If either wins, they will become the fifth adapted screenplay winner in the 21st century to also direct the film, joining Joel and Ethan CoenPeter Jackson and Alexander Payne, who won twice.

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Wednesday September 19th, 2012

Hollywood Film Awards to Honor Producers of ‘Les Miserables,’ ‘Anna Karenina’

By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter


The Hollywood Reporter has learned that Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner, the Brits who co-run Working Title Films and are the producers of the upcoming awards contenders Anna Karenina and Les Miserables, will receive the Hollywood Producers Award at the 16th annual Hollywood Film Awards — the first awards show of the 2012 Oscar season — when its gala ceremony is held Oct. 22 at the Beverly Hilton.

The Hollywood Awards, which are determined by Hollywood Film Festival founder and executive director Carlos de Abreu and his advisory team, recognize individuals for both career achievement and work released within the calendar year. Previous recipients of the Hollywood Producers Award include Mel GibsonMike MedavoyRyan KavanaughChristian Colson and Danny Boyle, and, last year, Letty Aronson.

Of Bevan and Fellner, de Abreu tells THR, “It will be our great pleasure to recognize these two talented and prolific producers at this year’s event.”

Sunday September 9th, 2012

Summer Recap: From Olympics To ‘Newsroom,’ The Season’s Highs and Lows

By Rachel Bennett
Television Editor & Columnist


A week ago, Breaking Bad finished the first half of its fifth and final season. In other words, summer TV has ended.

Although some shows, such as FX’s Louie and AMC’s Hell on Wheels, still have more episodes to go before their seasons conclude, NBC will be unveiling some of its new fall series this week — and the other networks won’t be too far behind.

To be honest, summer TV isn’t my favorite. I use the season to catch up on TV I’ve missed more than I do to watch such new offerings as TBS’s Men at Work and E!’s Married to Jonas.

However, this doesn’t mean all of summer TV is a bust.

Here are the choices for the brightest and darkest spots of summer TV 2012:

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Wednesday October 5th, 2011

Hollywood Film Festival Announces Producer, Screenwriter, Breakthrough Director and Composer Honorees (Exclusive)

The 15th annual Hollywood Film Festival and Hollywood Film Awards, presented by Starz Entertainment, will honor Golden Globe winner Letty Aronson with its Hollywood Producer Award for Midnight in Paris, Michel Hazanavicius with its Hollywood Breakthrough Director Award for The Artist, Oscar winner Diablo Cody with its Hollywood Screenwriter Award for Young Adult and two-time Oscar nominee Alberto Iglesias with its Hollywood Film Composer Award for both Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy and The Skin I Live In. All four individuals will collect their statuettes at the Hollywood Awards Gala Ceremony, which will take place at the Beverly Hilton on Oct. 24.

Click to read more…

Monday January 10th, 2011


Tomorrow, the Directors Guild of America will announce its five nominees for the 2010 DGA Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Feature Film. I believe that they will be (in alphabetical order)…

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Thursday January 6th, 2011


  • Entertainment Weekly: Dave Karger speaks with Julia Roberts after a special screening of “Biutiful” at CAA that she hosted for industry insiders to help call attention to the performance of her “Eat Pray Love” co-star Javier Bardem. (Robert Forster, Kyle MacLachlan, and Bardem’s pregnant wife Penelope Cruz were among the attendees.) Roberts explains, “I think the movie hasn’t gotten the exposure. You don’t know where it is. It’s like this hidden little jewel… I just have a great appreciation for what he went through to show us all this.”
  • Deadline Hollywood: Mike Fleming interviews producer-extraordinaire Scott Rudin, who this week became the first producer to receive PGA Award nominations for two features in the same year (for “The Social Network” and “True Grit”), and who will also be receiving the David O. Selznick Achievement Award at the PGA Awards ceremony. Rudin credits his “great [producing] partners on both” and emphasizes that while “the Oscar stuff is fantastic, rewarding and in some ways exciting… it’s not why you do it. You do it because you want to hold your own work to a standard of excellence.” He also notes that while he was heavily involved with the pre-production of both films (he worked closely with the screenwriters, for instance, while they formulated their scripts), he stayed out of the way of the directors during the filmmaking process itself.
  • Awards Tracker: Tom O’Neil advises those who believe that “True Grit” is now the best picture favorite just because it has done well at the box-office ($91.5 million and counting) to “hold your horses.” He submits that “financial success isn’t as important as it used to be to Oscar victory,” citing the fact the best picture Oscar winner went to films that earned at least $100 million domestically 75% of the time between 1986 and 2005, but that 60% of those since have gone to films that did not, including “Crash” ($54 million), “No Country for Old Men” ($74 million), and “The Hurt Locker” ($14 million, or $746 million less than it’s fellow nominee “Avatar”).
  • Hollywood-Elsewhere: Jeff Wells passes along an andorsement of the work of the cinematographer Hoyt Van Hoytema on “The Fighter” from legendary cinematographer Michael Chapman, who lensed perhaps the greatest boxing movie of all-time, “Raging Bull” (1980), among other classics. Chapman writes, “The movie struck me as doing the basic thing that cinematography does when it’s done well, which is to present a three-dimensional stage in which the actors can move.”
  • The Carpetbagger: Larry Rother mourns the fact that the French film “Carlos,” one of the most critically-beloved movies of 2010, is ineligible for Oscar consideration in any category this year “because of a quirk in the rules set by the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts & Sciences.” The film “was initially broadcast on French television before it was packaged and sold abroad for distribution, in two different versions, one long and one short, as a feature film,” which constitutes a violation of an Academy rule that states, “Films that, in any version, receive their first public exhibition or distribution in any manner other than as a theatrical motion picture release will not be eligible for Academy Awards in any category.”
  • Vulture: Jordana Horn asks Quentin Tarantino why he omitted Sofia Coppola’s “Somewhere” — the film to which the Venice Film Festival jury, over which he presided, awarded the Golden Lion back in September — from his year-end top 20 film list. “I’m a little embarrassed by it, actually,” Tarantino says, explaining, “It was never meant to be a dig against ‘Somewhere,’ or Sofia. I simply didn’t consider any of the films I’d seen in Venice for the list.” I put them in a separate box — I was on official duty at that time, not seeing the films theatrically, independently… Now I wish I’d put it on there — I didn’t think anyone would pay attention.” He adds, “I’d have put it in my top 10.”

Photo: Javier Bardem and Julia Roberts. Credit: Entertainment Weekly.

Sunday December 26th, 2010


PLEASE NOTE: The following rankings and remarks reflect my personal opinions and do/will not in any way impact my projections or analysis on this site, wherein I strive above all else to correctly forecast what will happen, not what I believe should happen. My demonstrated ability to do that over the years is what has led most of you to my site, and any failure to do that will undoubtedly lead you away from it, so you can rest assured that I mean it when I say that one has/will have no bearing on the other.

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Friday December 3rd, 2010


Deep Vote,” an Oscar winning screenwriter and a member of the Academy, will write this column — exclusively for ScottFeinberg.com — every week until the Academy Awards. He will help to peel back the curtain on the Oscar voting process by sharing his thoughts about the films he sees and, ultimately, his nomination and final ballots, as well. His identity must be protected in order to spare him from repercussions for disclosing the aforementioned information.

Thus far, he has shared his thoughts in column one about his general preferences; column two about Winter’s Bone” (Roadside Attractions, 6/11, R, trailer) and Solitary Man” (Anchor Bay Films, 5/21, R, trailer); column three about Alice in Wonderland” (Disney, 3/5, PG, trailer), “Toy Story 3” (Disney, 6/18, G, trailer), and “Mother and Child” (Sony Pictures Classics, 5/7, R, trailer); and column four about Get Low” (Sony Pictures Classics, 7/30, PG-13, trailer), “The Kids Are All Right” (Focus Features, 7/9, R, trailer), and “The Social Network” (Columbia, 10/1, PG-13, trailer).

This week, he assesses three more awards hopefuls: “127 Hours” (Fox Searchlight, 11/5, R, trailer), “Biutiful” (Roadside Attractions, 12/17, R, trailer), and “Shutter Island” (Paramount, 2/19, R, trailer)

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