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Posts Tagged ‘Game of Thrones’

Friday December 6th, 2013

The Excision of the TV Protagonist

By Søren Hough
Contributor

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Television has apexed once again. If the Emmys have proven anything over the past few years, it is that we live in what celebrated filmmaker Steven Soderbergh refers to as “a second golden age of television.” The networks — cable and streaming, more than broadcast — are investing more than ever in smart, original and ambitious shows, and are consequently producing more high-quality material than ever before. So successful have these networks become that major figures in the film industry have begun to make the once-unthinkable jump from the big screen to the small screen. Indeed, everyone from Steven Spielberg to Kevin Spacey seems to be hopping on the bandwagon.

But at what cost? Has this shift in production value brought with it narrative strength? Maybe not.

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Monday October 21st, 2013

From Text to Tube: Why Popular Lit Can Make for Great TV

By Rachel Bennett
Contributor

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When a book becomes a hit, topping bestseller lists and leaving store shelves vacant, one question always quickly follows: “When will it be turned into a movie?”

Audiences have seen this time and time again, with major examples being Gone with the Wind, To Kill a Mockingbird and The Lord of the Rings series, among many others.

Adapting literature to film can be a win-win situation, as it provides an original story with a built-in audience that will likely buy tickets come opening day. At the same time, not every book translates to box-office success, with some vehicles being better suited to a smaller medium — like TV.

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Friday September 20th, 2013

The Great Migration of Movie Stars… to Television?!

By Doreen Alexander Child
Contributor

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Just a generation ago it would have been unimaginable, but the fact of the matter is this: since the arrival of premium cable and the rise of HBO about 30 years ago, television has provided quality entertainment on a more consistent basis than movies. This has never been more true than it is today, with the movies dominated by mindless remakes, sequels and adaptations, while TV offers the likes of not only HBO but also AMC, Showtime and now even streaming alternatives like Netflix, all of which proudly air original and edgy content of the sort that one used to find at the cineplex before the studios were swallowed by profit-obsessed conglomerates. Now, not only viewers look at TV differently — but so, too, do talent.

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Sunday February 10th, 2013

7 Lessons NBC can Learn from other Networks

By Rachel Bennett
Television Editor & Columnist

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After a fantastic fall that moved it from fourth to first place among the major networks, NBC is hitting yet another rough patch this spring.

The premieres of new shows Deception, 1600 Penn and Do No Harm failed (NBC is pulling the plug on Do No Harm after two episodes), and promising rookies Go On and The New Normal are tumbling without lead-in The Voice. Aside from this, Smash saw its second season premiere down 39 percent from its May season finale, attracting 4.5 million viewers and just a 1.1 adults rating.

On top of it all, NBC’s Up All Night star Christina Applegate is leaving the comedy as it’s in the middle of a major creative overhaul, saying, “It’s been a great experience working on Up All Night, but the show has taken a different creative direction and I decided it was best for me to move on to other endeavors.”

We’ve written a lot about NBC’s struggles, but it’s time to look ahead at how it can change for the better. And why not learn from example? Here are lessons NBC would be wise to pick up from its more successful network companions:

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Saturday February 9th, 2013

TV Rewind: Applegate Parts With ‘Up All Night,’ Roberts Announces Return, ‘Office’ Sets Its Close

By Rachel Bennett
Television Editor & Columnist

Every Friday, Rachel recaps the week’s major TV-related news, announcements and gossip!

* * *

TOP STORIES

• In a surprising move, NBC’s Up All Night star Christina Applegate is leaving the comedy halfway through its second season, which is undergoing major behind-the-scenes changes. “It’s been a great experience working on Up All Night, but the show has taken a different creative direction and I decided it was best for me to move on to other endeavors,” says Applegate of her departure.

• ABC’s Good Morning America co-anchor Robin Roberts is reclaiming her seat Feb. 20 following a battle with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), a rare blood disorder. Welcome back!

• The end is in sight for NBC’s The Office: The one-hour series finale is set for May 16.

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Thursday January 31st, 2013

Why Haven’t Cable Comedies Caught Up To The Success Of Cable Dramas?

By Rachel Bennett
Television Editor & Columnist

***

If you’ve read any of my articles, you probably know I’m a huge fan of NBC’s Parks and Recreation.

Although the series hasn’t done too well at award shows, it’s still one of the best comedies around — an impressive feat considering just how many wonderful ones there are.

Aside from the award darlings (ABC’s Modern Family, NBC’s 30 Rock, Fox’s New Girl, HBO’s Girls and CBS’s The Big Bang Theory), there are also the championed, cult comedies that somehow miss being nominated: ABC’s Happy Endings, NBC’s Community, TBS’s Cougar Town, ABC’s The Middle, ABC’s Suburgatory and, of course, Parks and Recreation.

In short, broadcast comedies are still at the top of their game. It’s a stark contrast to network dramas, which have largely faded from awards discussion and watercooler conversation.

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Friday January 25th, 2013

TV Rewind: ‘Mad Men’ To Premiere With Film, Carrell Stays Away From ‘Office,’ Fox and ABC Pull Major Shows

By Rachel Bennett
Television Editor & Columnist

Every Friday, Rachel recaps the week’s major TV-related news, announcements and gossip!

* * *

TOP STORIES

• In a rare occurrence, there’s a lot of Mad Men (AMC) news this week. The drama will kick off its sixth season April 7 with a two-hour premiere/movie, which will see the series jump forward in time — although creator Matthew Weiner isn’t revealing by how much. To tide you over, here are four promo shots from the new season.

• Sadly, it seems former NBC’s The Office star Steve Carell won’t be returning for the comedy’s series finale. Of the decision not to reprise his role, the actor says, “I just didn’t think it was right for the character because that character had had an arc within the story and kind of grew and sort of evolved past the idea of the documentary.”

• Two disappointing almost-cancellations to report: ABC and Fox have pulled Don’t Trust the B—- in Apartment 23 and Ben and Kate from their schedules, respectively. Although the comedies haven’t officially been canceled, don’t hold your breath for additional seasons.

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Saturday January 19th, 2013

Is The Criticism Shrouding ‘Girls’ Legitimate?

By Rachel Bennett
Television Editor & Columnist

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Guys, we need to talk about Girls.

Ever since the HBO comedy premiered April 15, 2012, there’s been controversy following in its footsteps — and I’m a little sick of it.

Yes, the series is loved by most critics. The first season won rave reviews and nabbed Girls two Golden Globes, including Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy, just a week ago.

But thanks to the Internet, viewers and some critics have nitpicked — at times reasonably, but mostly not — at several issues surrounding Girls.

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Friday January 18th, 2013

TV Rewind: ‘Globes’ Broadcast Dominates, ‘The Killing’ Resurges, ‘Idol’ Ratings Plummet

By Rachel Bennett
Television Editor & Columnist

Every Friday, Rachel recaps the week’s major TV-related news, announcements and gossip!

* * *

TOP STORIES

• The 2013 Golden Globes dominated the ratings Sunday, drawing 20 million viewers. There was a 17 percent increase in audience members over last year’s ceremony, and the show was up 28 percent in the 18-49 demo, scoring a 6.4 adult rating.

• AMC’s The Killing, which got the ax this summer, is officially coming back for a third season. The drama will return to AMC along with stars Mireille Enos and Joel Kinnaman, but not everything will be the same: Detectives Linden and Holder (Enos and Kinnaman) will be working on a new case a year after solving the Rosie Larsen (Katie Findlay) murder.

• Despite adding judges Mariah Carey, Keith Urban and Nicki Minaj, the new season of Fox’s American Idol debuted to its smallest premiere audience ever. Although the reality show still drew 17.9 million viewers, that’s a 19 percent drop from the previous season premiere.

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Thursday January 3rd, 2013

The Top 13 Most Anticipated TV Series of 2013

By Rachel Bennett
Television Editor & Columnist

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Now that 2012 is behind us, it’s time to look forward to what 2013 has to offer.

Specifically, what TV should we check out this year? When taking into account new and returning shows, there’s a lot to choose from — and it’s a little overwhelming.

After careful consideration, I’ve chosen 13 series, new and old, that I can’t wait to check out. Take a look below that the top 13 most anticipated TV series of 2013, and let me know what you think!

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