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Posts Tagged ‘Jake Gyllenhaal’

Saturday September 6th, 2014

Toronto: Can the Acclaimed Genre Film ‘Nightcrawler’ Crack Into Oscar Race?


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

Open Road Films’ Nightcrawler may or may not turn out to be “an awards movie” — “genre films” rarely do — but it is destined to become a classic and was received accordingly, with a loud and partial standing ovation, after its world premiere on Friday night at Roy Thomson Hall as part of the Toronto International Film Festival.

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Monday January 7th, 2013

What Would Happen To The Oscars Race If Late-Year Releases Were Removed?

By Joey Magidson
Film Contributor

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I always enjoy looking at alternate versions of the Oscar race. It’s just an experiment, but there are still a number of interesting dynamics that I notice about the year in awards contenders when playing around with eligible films.

In years past, I’ve wondered what were the No. 11 films in the two years that Oscar had a guaranteed crop of 10 Best Picture nominees. I’ve also considered what the Oscars nods would have looked like if you removed every contender that was actually nominated. This time around, I’m trying something a little different.

With the Academy only days away from announcing their noms, I wanted to look at how the race would look if you took out any of the contenders that hit in the final part of the year. Essentially, if you disqualified the films that went into release after September, what might the Oscar nominations look like this week?

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Thursday November 8th, 2012

Jake Gyllenhaal Declares That He’ll Only Take On Challenging Projects in the Future (Video)

By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

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I recently had the opportunity to sit down in New York with the Oscar-nominated actor Jake Gyllenhaal following a screening of his hit film End of Watch for a wide-ranging conversation about his life and career. Gyllenhaal, who will turn 32 next month and has now been acting professionally for 21 years, says that he recently arrived at something of a turning-point in both: after his experience with End of Watch and now the acclaimed off-Broadway play If There Is I Haven’t Found It Yet, he has decided that he will only take on projects that challenge and mean as much to him as they do. Together — as you can see for yourself by checking out the video at the top of this page or read about below — we took a look back at his remarkable journey to this conclusion.

Wednesday September 12th, 2012

The Top 10 Actors Who Should Return To TV

By Rachel Bennett
Television Editor & Columnist

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Movies used to be gold standard for actors, with George Clooney, Tom Hanks and Leonardo DiCaprio leaving the small screen for the big to achieve great professional and financial success.

However, times are changing, and many actors who left TV to work in movies are coming back, including Eddie Murphy, Robin Williams and Michael J. Fox. Due to the addition of cable and subscription-based original programming, better roles are being created that will give actors a chance for the recognition, awards and job security that movies no longer  provide. Just look at Claire Danes, who returned to TV to star in Showtime’s Homeland, for which she’s nominated for an Emmy.

There are several actors who should return to TV, but not all of them will. Take a look at the top 10 TV stars who’ve left TV but should return:

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Tuesday May 8th, 2012

‘End of Watch’ Action Thriller Starring Jake Gyllenhaal and Michael Peña

By Josh Abraham

End Of Watch stars Academy Award nominee Jake Gyllenhaal and Michael Peña as young Los Angeles police officers Taylor and Zavala as they patrol the city’s meanest streets of south central Los Angeles.

Click to read more…

Saturday July 30th, 2011

THE “DOUBLE” STANDARD

It seems to me that an unusual number of films from this year revolve around characters morphing, through one process or another, into “better” versions of themselves… and not just in adaptations of comic-books. I can’t think of anything, in particular, that might explain this trend — maybe it’s just a strange coincidence — but it is real. Consider the following examples (amongst which are obviously numerous spoilers)…

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Wednesday January 26th, 2011

“DEEP VOTE” ON “BARNEY’S VERSION,” “LOVE AND OTHER DRUGS,” “TANGLED”

Deep Vote,” an Oscar winning screenwriter and a member of the Academy, will write this column — exclusively for ScottFeinberg.com — every week until the Academy Awards in order to help to peel back the curtain on the Oscar voting process. (His identity must be protected in order to spare him from repercussions for disclosing the aforementioned information.)

Thus far, he has shared his thoughts in column one about his general preferences; column two about Winter’s Bone” (Roadside Attractions, 6/11, R, trailer) and Solitary Man” (Anchor Bay Films, 5/21, R, trailer); column three about Alice in Wonderland” (Disney, 3/5, PG, trailer), “Toy Story 3” (Disney, 6/18, G, trailer), and “Mother and Child” (Sony Pictures Classics, 5/7, R, trailer); column four about Get Low” (Sony Pictures Classics, 7/30, PG-13, trailer), “The Kids Are All Right” (Focus Features, 7/9, R, trailer), and “The Social Network” (Columbia, 10/1, PG-13, trailer); column five about “127 Hours” (Fox Searchlight, 11/5, R, trailer), “Biutiful” (Roadside Attractions, 12/17, R, trailer), and “Shutter Island” (Paramount, 2/19, R, trailer); column six about Inception” (Warner Brothers, 7/16, PG-13, trailer), “Made in Dagenham” (Sony Pictures Classics, 11/19, R, trailer), and “Somewhere” (Focus Features, 12/22, R, trailer); column seven about Another Year” (Sony Pictures Classics, 12/29, PG-13, trailer), “Fair Game” (Summit, 11/5, PG-13, trailer), and “Rabbit Hole” (Lionsgate, 12/17, PG-13, trailer); column eight about Blue Valentine” (The Weinstein Company, 12/29, R, trailer), “The Fighter” (Paramount, 12/10, R, trailer), and “True Grit” (Paramount, 12/22, PG-13, trailer); column nine about The Ghost Writer” (Summit, 2/19, PG-13, trailer), The King’s Speech” (The Weinstein Company, 11/26, R, trailer), and “The Town” (Warner Brothers, 9/17, R, trailer); column ten about Black Swan” (Fox Searchlight, 12/3, R, trailer), “Conviction” (Fox Searchlight, 10/15, R, trailer), and “I Am Love” (Magnolia, 6/18, R, trailer); column eleven about his nomination ballots; and column twelve about All Good Things” (Magnolia, 12/3, R, trailer), “Animal Kingdom” (Sony Pictures Classics, 8/13, R, trailer), and “The Way Back” (Newmarket, 12/29, PG-13, trailer).

This week, he assesses three more films: “Barney’s Version” (Sony Pictures Classics, 12/3, R, trailer), “Love and Other Drugs” (20th Century Fox, 11/24, R, trailer), and “Tangled” (Disney, 11/24, PG, trailer).

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Wednesday January 12th, 2011

INTERVIEW: JAKE GYLLENHAAL OPENS UP ABOUT ALL BUT LOVE, OTHER DRUGS

Last week, I had the opportunity to chat by phone for about 35 minutes with the actor Jake Gyllenhaal, 30, who will be attending the Golden Globe Awards on Sunday night as a best actor (musical or comedy) nominee for his performance opposite Anne Hathaway in Edward Zwick’s edgy romantic-dramedy “Love and Other Drugs” (20th Century Fox, 11/24, R, trailer). In the film, which is largely based on Jamie Reidy’s autobiography, Gyllenhaal inhabits a classic leading man role that Cary Grant would have played if the censors had allowed films like this to be played in his day (and if Viagra had already been invented). His Jamie is a charismatic pharmaceutical salesman who wants perhaps the only woman in the world who doesn’t want him — because, he eventually discovers, she is suffering from early-onset Parkinson’s Disease and dreads the thought of becoming a burden.

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Tuesday December 14th, 2010

BREAKING DOWN THE GOLDEN GLOBE NODS: KEY STATS, INCLUSIONS, SNUBS

To see a full list of the film nominees, click here!

Key Factoids

Noteworthy Inclusions

  • The Tourist” may have bombed at the box-office and been panned by critics, but that didn’t stop the HFPA from recognizing it in all three major categories in which it was eligible: the film for best picture (musical or comedy), Johnny Depp for best actor (musical or comedy), and Angelina Jolie for best actress (musical or comedy). How could the HFPA resisted that kind of star power?!
  • Halle Berry, returning to the screen after a three-year absence, was a surprise nominee for best actress (drama) for her performance as a woman with multiple personality disorder in “Frankie and Alice.”
  • Emma Stone, the 22-year-old actress who will next be seen in the reboot of the “Spider-Man” franchise, is now a certified member of Hollywood’s A-list thanks to her nomination for best actress (musical or comedy) for “Easy A.”
  • It was rumored that HFPA members really liked the unusual action flick “Red,” and indeed the film was nominated for best picture (musical or comedy), if not for the performances by its aging cast.
  • Ryan Gosling and Michelle Williams, the stars of the controversial indie “Blue Valentine,” were nominated for best actor (drama) and best actress (drama), respectively. These nominations were anything but assured.
  • Both female stars of “The Kids Are All Right,” Annette Bening and Julianne Moore, were nominated for best actress (musical or comedy). There was certainly a dearth of options in the category this year, but this could pre-sage a rare double-nomination at the Oscars.
  • Many people speculated that even if “The Fighter” did well, its director David O. Russell, who still bears scars from a YouTube shouting incident from years ago, would be left behind. This was not the case. Indeed, “The Fighter” was nominated in every major category in which it was eligible — the film for best picture (drama), Mark Wahlberg for best actor (drama), Christian Bale for best supporting actor, both Amy Adams and Melissa Leo for best supporting actress, and, yes, Russell for best director.

Noteworthy Snubs

  • True Grit,” the last major awards contender to be released this year, has been greeted warmly by critics, but was completely snubbed by the HFPA. There was always some doubt about whether Hailee Steinfeld, who arguably gives it finest performance, would be left behind due to category confusion (the HFPA wanted her in lead and Paramount wanted her in supporting), but several other nominations still seemed likely — the film for best picture (drama), Ethan Coen and Joel Coen for best director; Jeff Bridges for best actor (drama), and Matt Damon for best supporting actor.
  • The British dramedy “Made in Dagenham” was thought to be a serious contender in several categories — the film for best picture (musical or comedy), Sally Hawkins for best actress (musical or comedy), and possibly even Miranda Richardson for best supporting actress — but it wound up with zero nominations.
  • Love and Other Drugs” was denied a best picture (musical or comedy) nomination even though both of its stars were nominated — Jake Gyllenhaal for best actor (musical or comedy) and Anne Hathaway for best actress (musical or comedy).
  • A number of HFPA favorites from years past were denied nominations this morning: seven-time nominee/one-time winner Leonardo DiCaprio was not nominated in the best actor (drama) category for either of the two performances for which he was eligible, the one in “Inception” (even though the film was nominated for best picture, best director, best screenplay, and best original score) or the one in “Shutter Island”; six-time nominee/two-time winner Jim Carrey was not nominated in the best actor (musical or comedy) category for his performance in “I Love You Phillip Morris”; and five-time nominee/two-time winner Robert Downey, Jr. was not nominated in the best actor (musical or comedy) category for his performance in “Due Date.”

Photo: Halle Berry in “Frankie and Alice.” Credit: Freestyle Releasing.

Tuesday November 23rd, 2010

YOUR DAILY FIX OF OSCAR: 11/23/10

  • The Odds: Steve Pond reports that “The King’s Speech” was received very warmly by Oscar voters who attended its first official Academy screening on Saturday night at the 1,000-seat Samuel Goldwyn Theater, which one member told him was about 85% full. (According to Pond, “The turnout appears to be about the same as the attendance for ‘The Social Network,’ which also drew a strong reaction when it screened at the Goldwyn in early October.”) Another Academy member shared with Pond his immediate reaction: “Of course it will get all the English vote,” a key constituency that could prove to be a difference-maker in a close best picture race.
  • The Hollywood Reporter: Leslie Bruce, Randee Dawn, Todd Longwell, Carita Rizzo, Lauren Schutte, and Andrew Wallenstein profile — as part of the weekly magazine’s annual “Next Gen” special edition — a number of individuals who had breakthrough years in 2010 and have growing influence in the industry, including actors Andrew Garfield (“Never Let Me Go”/“The Social Network”) and Aaron Johnson (“Nowhere Boy”), actresses Jennifer Lawrence (“Winter’s Bone”) and Rooney Mara (“The Social Network”), and writer-directors Lena Dunham (“Tiny Furniture”) and Shana Feste (“Country Strong”).
  • Deadline Hollywood: Nikki Finke passes along the news that the Art Directors Guild has selected Patricia Norris as this year’s recipient of its Lifetime Achievement Award. Norris, who has been nominated for best costume design Oscar five times — for “Days of Heaven” (1978), “The Elephant Man” (1980), “Victor/Victoria” (1982), “2010” (1984), and “Sunset” (1988) — will be presented with the award at the 15th annual Excellence in Production Design Awards on February 5th.
  • Awards Daily: Sasha Stone pays tribute to Ronni Chasen, the publicist whose murder last week rocked Hollywood and remains an unsolved mystery. Stone shares the last email that she received from Chasen, in which the publicist tried to sell her on the prospects of Michael Douglas for a best supporting actor nod for “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps,” and writes, “Here’s to Ms. Chasen. And here’s to all the hard-working men and women who really and truly make the Oscar world go round. They never step up to take any of the credit… knowing that the more light is put on them the easier we can see the strings.”
  • Radar Online: An unattributed report summarizes and shares video of a segment from last night’s episode of “Chelsea Lately” on E! in which the talk show host Chelsea Handler and actress Anne Hathaway discussed Hathaway’s extensive nudity and numerous sex scenes with Jake Gyllenhaal in “Love and Other Drugs,” which hits theaters tomorrow. Hathaway tells Handler, “We decided from the get-go that real sex was out… We watched some films that do real sex and, I don’t know, that makes me feel weird.”

Photo: Colin Firth in “The King’s Speech.” Credit: The Weinstein Company.