Comedic Foreign Language Films Rarely Receive Oscar Nominations ... IDA Nominations: Doc Community Gets Behind ‘Citizenfour,’ ‘Finding Vivian Maier’ (Analysis) ... Jessica Chastain’s Incredible Rise ... Oscar Contender and New Marvel Superhero Chadwick Boseman on His Journey to Stardom ... ‘Mr. Turner’ Could Lead Timothy Spall to An Oscar Nomination ... Christopher Nolan’s ‘Interstellar’ May Not Be the Awards Juggernaut Everyone Expected ... Few Women-Centric Films Have Garnered Best Picture Nominations ... FEINBERG FORECAST: ‘Interstellar’ Launches, Gotham Nominates and PGA Conferences ...
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Posts Tagged ‘Jessica Chastain’

Wednesday October 29th, 2014

Jessica Chastain’s Incredible Rise


By Anjelica Oswald
Managing Editor 

From a newcomer award at the Deauville Film Festival in 2011 to a career tribute this fall, two-time Oscar nominee Jessica Chastain has come a long way in just three years. This year, she has been a part of four films: Christopher Nolan’s potential best picture nominee Interstellar, which opens in select theaters Nov. 5; J.C. Chandor’s A Most Violent Year, which is opening AFI Fest Nov. 6; Liv Ullmann’s Miss Julie, which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival; and Ned Benson’s The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Them, which premiered at the Cannes Film Festival and is a combination of 2013’s The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Her and The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Him.

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Thursday October 9th, 2014

Chicago Film Fest: Liv Ullmann on an Iconic Half-Century Career, Fest Opener ‘Miss Julie’


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

On Thursday evening, the 50th annual Chicago International Film Festival will kick off with the U.S. premiere of Miss Julie, the latest film from the legendary Liv Ullmann, who made her name as an actress in the great films of Ingmar Bergman and Jan Troell, and who has since become a first-rate filmmaker in her own right.

At the recent Toronto International Film Festival, where Miss Julie — the latest adaptation of August Strindberg‘s 1888 upstairs-downstairs dramatic play — had its world premiere, I had the rare opportunity to sit down with the 75-year-old for an hour-long interview about her remarkable life, career and latest project. It did not disappoint.

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Monday October 6th, 2014

Oscar Nominations Rare for Portrayals of the Same Character in the Same Film

By Anjelica Oswald
Managing Editor

[WARNING: Potential spoilers ahead for Interstellar.]

Only two times in Oscar history have there been Oscar nominations for two actors playing the same character in the same film. The first time this happened was in 1998 when Kate Winslet received a lead actress nomination for her portrayal of a young Rose in Titanic (1997) and Gloria Stuart received a supporting actress nomination for Old Rose. Winslet did it again in 2002 when she was nominated for her supporting role as Young Iris Murdoch in Iris (2001) and Judi Dench was nominated for her lead role.

More often than not, when there are multiple portrayals of a character in a film, there is a child actor and the adult who gets the more prominent role and the Oscar nomination, such as with Forrest Gump (1994). Tom Hanks won an Oscar for his portrayal of Forrest Gump, while Michael Conner Humphreys played Young Forrest.

Should Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar meet — or exceed — expectations after its release Nov. 5 or Nov. 7, depending on the theater, Jessica Chastain and Ellen Burstyn could have a shot at becoming the third pair of actresses to receive nominations for playing the same role.

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Wednesday February 6th, 2013

Emmanuelle Riva: The True Sleeper Nominee Of Oscar Night?

By Joey Magidson
Film Contributor

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We’ve been paying a lot of attention to Argo of late in regard to the Oscars, but there are some big races that don’t involve Ben Affleck’s film. Most notably, there’s a competitive Best Actress race going on.

Many pundits have made it out to be a competition between Jessica Chastain and Jennifer Lawrence, with the latter far out in the lead. While I agree that the Silver Linings Playbook actress is certainly ahead of her Zero Dark Thirty competitor, I do think she has to watch out for Emmanuelle Riva in her rear-view mirror. The sleeper candidate from Amour may just wake everyone up on Oscar night and steal the trophy.

Riva is immensely deserving of her nomination, but up until recently, it didn’t seem like many thought she had a legitimate shot at a win. I’ll confess to being there for a while, but the more I think about it, the more it seems like she’s at least the dark horse or spoiler of the category, if not the current alternative to Lawrence. Read the rest of this entry »

Monday January 21st, 2013

FEINBERG FORECAST: Updated Projections (With 5 Weeks Until the 85th Oscars)

By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

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Every week through the Oscars on Feb. 24, The Hollywood Reporter’s awards analyst Scott Feinberg will release a new “Feinberg Forecast,” a post in which he recaps the most noteworthy awards-related news of the past week and shares his latest assessment of the standings in each of the major awards categories. (For more information about Feinberg and how he arrives at his projections, as well as a key for the various colors and acronyms that appear throughout them, scroll to the bottom of this post.)

Monday January 14th, 2013

Which Film Festivals And Release Periods Were Most Effective For This Year’s Oscar Nominees?

By Joey Magidson
Film Contributor

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If you’re like me, you’re still recovering from the surprises that the Academy threw us on Thursday. In an attempt to try and move away from figuring out the “why” of the Oscar nominations last week, I decided to look at the “when” and “where” of the films and performances that were nominated. I’m curious to see which release period of the year and which film festivals were the most effective launching pads for award nominees in 2012.

It’s no secret that certain periods of the year and certain festivals are lighter than others. Fests like Tribeca and months like January just don’t jive with Oscar. In fact, I recently looked at the festival season in a previous article (found here) to see which ones contributed the most awards players this year. Likewise, when I removed the late-season releases a week or so ago from the Oscar race (found here), I found just how many contenders are from the last few months of the year.

Now that we have the nominees for the Academy Awards at our disposal, we can look at the main categories and see if there’s anything more we can learn. Did any one film festival wind up doing especially well? Was there a choice period of release for the movies and performances that were cited by Oscar voters? Let’s take a look …

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Wednesday January 9th, 2013

The Biggest Factors To Look Forward To At The 2013 Golden Globes

By Joey Magidson
Film Contributor

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Aside from the Academy Awards, no ceremony has as much pomp and circumstance to it each year than the Golden Globe Awards. While the Golden Globes don’t have the same cultural legacy that the Oscars do, the former is definitely an event that affects the latter at times. Most years, the influence on Oscar is there, but it’s minimal. This year, however, we could be looking at a time when Oscar voters are looking to the Globes more than ever before.

The reason for this added interest is the new timeframe for Academy members to vote. Usually there’s more distance between the Globe nominations and the Oscar nominations, which is not the case here. This makes the Globes a show to look forward to more than is usual.

I’m not going to outright list the things to most look forward to with the Golden Globes this year, but there are a lot, and they don’t all have to do with the Oscar race. One can see what the Hollywood Foreign Press does this year and enjoy it independently of what eventually goes down with the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. There will be simple pleasures on display for all awards show and movie fans to enjoy.

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Monday January 7th, 2013

What Would Happen To The Oscars Race If Late-Year Releases Were Removed?

By Joey Magidson
Film Contributor

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I always enjoy looking at alternate versions of the Oscar race. It’s just an experiment, but there are still a number of interesting dynamics that I notice about the year in awards contenders when playing around with eligible films.

In years past, I’ve wondered what were the No. 11 films in the two years that Oscar had a guaranteed crop of 10 Best Picture nominees. I’ve also considered what the Oscars nods would have looked like if you removed every contender that was actually nominated. This time around, I’m trying something a little different.

With the Academy only days away from announcing their noms, I wanted to look at how the race would look if you took out any of the contenders that hit in the final part of the year. Essentially, if you disqualified the films that went into release after September, what might the Oscar nominations look like this week?

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Monday December 3rd, 2012

New York Film Critics Circle Goes With ‘Zero Dark Thirty,’ Bigelow

By Sean O’Connell
Hollywood News

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This turned out to be a very good day to conduct Zero Dark Thirty interviews.

As I sat across from Jessica Chastain and Jason Clark to discuss their roles in Kathryn Bigelow’s Zero Dark Thirty, the uncompromising thriller about the military’s efforts to unearth Osama Bin Laden was collecting Best Picture votes from the New York Film Critics Circle. The group also handed its Best Director prize to Bigelow while Greig Fraser won for his cinematography contributions. (The final scene, an expertly shot raid on Bin Laden’s Pakistani hideout, alone likely earned him the award.)

 

Sunday November 25th, 2012

‘Zero Dark Thirty’ Finally Screens, Enters Thick of Crowded Oscar Race (Analysis)

By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

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Zero Dark Thirty, written by Mark Boal and directed by Kathryn Bigelow — who both won Oscars for their last film, 2009’s best picture winner The Hurt Locker — screened Sunday for press on both coasts. The film provides a two-hour-and-40-minute overview of America’s nearly decade-long effort to hunt down Osama bin Laden. As a moviegoing experience — as it was in life — it is a long, cerebral and emotionally draining story, but it holds interest throughout. And thanks to a minimalist but powerful star turn by Jessica Chastain — an Oscar nominee last year for The Help — as well as the filmmakers’ painstaking attention to documented detail and remarkable third-act re-creation of the Navy SEALs’ fateful mission, it is worth the journey. As with fellow best picture Oscar hopeful Argo, you knows how it ends before it begins, and yet you can’t help but sit nervously on the edge of your seat as it nears its resolution.