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Joe Wilson | ScottFeinberg.com
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Countdown to Oscars

Posts Tagged ‘Joe Wilson’

Tuesday November 30th, 2010

YOUR DAILY FIX OF OSCAR: 11/30/10

  • The Race: Tim Appelo reveals why Sean Penn has abstained from campaigning for the film “Fair Game” — not to mention his own performance in it as former U.S. ambassador Joseph Wilson — this awards season: he and director Doug Liman clashed throughout the production, leading Penn to “boycott” any further involvement with the film.
  • In Contention: Guy Lodge reports that “The Social Network” has topped the 2010 list of critics’ favorites that is releases each year by the British magazine Sight & Sound, making it the first American film to earn that distinction in years. The only other films with awards potential that made the cut were “Another Year” (#3) and “Winter’s Bone” and “I Am Love” (tied for #6).
  • The Odds: Steve Pond wonders if “Black Swan” and “The Fighter” — both of which are non-traditional and somewhat disturbing films — will register as “just too damn weird” for Academy voters.
  • Hollywood-Elsewhere: Jeff Wells posts a photo of “Solitary Man”/“Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps” star Michael Douglas (who is recovering from throat cancer) and his family that was snapped last week at Orlando’s Epcot center. It’s great to see that the beloved actor is looking much better than he did in photos that paparazzi snapped and sold to tabloids several weeks ago!
  • New York Times: Charles McGrath shares the story behind the film “Barney’s Version,” Richard J. Lewis’s adaptation of Mordecai Richler’s beloved book of the same title that was long thought to be “just about unfilmable,” but was ultimately made with Oscar nominee Paul Giamatti in the title role. (It “will play in New York and Los Angeles for one week starting December 3, in the hope, presumably, of snagging an Oscar nomination for Mr. Giamatti, who with the help of several wigs ages four decades in a little over two hours.”)

Photo: Paul Giamatti in “Barney’s Version.” Credit: Sony Pictures Classics.

Wednesday October 27th, 2010

FLASH: SEAN PENN GOES SUPPORTING

I learned today that Sean Penn, who has won the best actor Oscar twice during the past decade, will be pushed in the best supporting actor category for his performance as former ambassador Joe Wilson in Doug Liman’s “Fair Game” (Summit, 11/5, trailer).

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Thursday October 14th, 2010

YOUR DAILY FIX OF OSCAR: 10/14/10

  • Variety: Andrew Stewart notes that Julian Schnabel’s “Miral” isn’t the only film from The Weinstein Company with a release date change this week. According to the studio, Ben Affleck’s “The Company Men” has also been pushed back — but, unlike “Miral,” not out of this year’s race — from October 22 to December 10. No reason for the move was provided.
  • Deadline Hollywood: Nikki Finke passes along the Academy’s announcement that it has chosen eight short subject documentaries (from a list of thirty that were eligible) for its short list of contenders for a 2011 Academy Award, three to five of which will receive actual nominations and one of which will take home a statuette.
  • New York Times: Maureen Dowd calls “Fair Game” — the story of Valerie Plame Wilson (Naomi Watts) and Joe Wilson (Sean Penn) — “a vivid reminder of one of the most egregious abuses of power in history,” noting, “They were the Girl and Boy Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest, and we should all remember what flew out.”
  • The Film Experience: Nathaniel Rogers spots the fun stat that Jesse Eisenberg would bump Matt Damon off the list of the top 10 youngest nominees for the best actor Oscar if — as he is widely expected to — he receives a best actor nomination for “The Social Network.” Eisenberg would be 27 years old, as was Damon when he was nominated for “Good Will Hunting” (1997), but 14 days younger.
  • Hollywood-Elsewhere: Jeff Wells writes that Rosamund Pike “easily gives the most arresting performance” in both “Made in Dagenham” and “Barney’s World,” portraying “elegant, well-educated wives of character and principle” in both, and urges Academy members to look beyond those films’ flaws and nominate one of her performances for best supporting actress. (Scott agrees.)
  • The Washington Post: Tim Craig and Bull Turque report that Michelle Rhee, the no-nonsense chancellor of Washington, D.C. public schools (who is featured prominently in Davis Guggenheim’s doc “Waiting for ‘Superman’”), has resigned from her post after 3.5 years. The city’s “presumptive mayor-elect” (who, in a recent primary, ousted the mayor who appointed Rhee) said it was a “mutual decision” to part ways, but Rhee described it as “heartbreaking.”
  • The Wrap: Steve Pond reports that Bruce Davis, the Academy’s executive director and “highest-ranking salaried employee,” will be retiring after 30 years spent overseeing some of the most monumental shifts within AMPAS. In an email to his staff, Davis wrote, “Organizations and individuals both benefit from periodic shifts in perspective.”
  • The Playlist: Oli Lyttelton believes there are “plenty of viral Internet comedy shows out there competing for your procrastination time,” but “none of them have managed to be as consistently funny and generally excellent” as Zach Galifianakis’s “Between Two Ferns” on the Funny or Die site. In the latest installment, Galifianakis sits down with “Red” star Bruce Willis, and hilarity quickly ensues.

Photo: Tommy Lee Jones and Ben Affleck in “The Company Men.” Credit: The Weinstein Company.

Sunday September 12th, 2010

IS IT STILL A “SPOILER” IF EVERYONE ALREADY KNOWS THE ENDING?

It recently struck me that five of this year’s awards hopefuls share something in common: the vast majority of people who will pay to see them in theaters will do so knowing their endings — or at least the moral of their stories — before they even begin. That can’t be a good thing, can it? Before proceeding to the five examples, here’s a “spoiler alert” for those of you who live under a rock…

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