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Posts Tagged ‘Mark Ruffalo’

Sunday January 31st, 2016

SAG Awards: ‘Spotlight’ Victory Confirms We Have an Oscar Race, Folks! (Analysis)

THR's awards analyst explains why Saturday's wins for Leonardo DiCaprio, Brie Larson and Alicia Vikander bode very well for their prospects at the Oscars — and why best pic remains too close to call.

By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

As if the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences needed some more salt thrown into the gaping wound it suffered upon the announcement of this year’s Oscar nominations, the 22nd annual Screen Actors Guild Awards produced the most diverse set of winners in the event’s history.

With Academy president Cheryl Boone Isaacs sitting in the audience, Idris Elba was awarded the best supporting actor prize for his performance in Beasts of No Nation — one that the Academy’s actors branch didn’t even nominate — and there were many other winners of color on the TV side, including Elba, again, forLuther; Uzo Aduba for Orange Is the New Black (which also won best comedy series); Queen Latifah for Bessie; and Viola Davis for How to Get Away With Murder. And in a nod toward gender diversity, Jeffrey Tambor won for his portrayal of a trans woman in Transparent.

It all was enough to make one wonder if the most effective way to reform the Academy might be to invite the thousands of guild members — including the 160,000 who belong to SAG-AFTRA, the largest union of actors in the world — to help pick the Oscar nominees, as they used to do decades ago.

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Monday November 30th, 2015

Gotham Awards: ‘Spotlight’ Edges ‘Carol’ in Battle of Indie Oscar Hopefuls (Analysis)

THR's awards analyst explains why the big night for 'Spotlight' is no more or less predictive of Oscar than, say, actings wins for Bel Powley and Mya Taylor.

By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

The 25th Gotham Independent Film Awards, which took place on Monday night in New York, don’t indicate, in any real way, what the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, which awards the Oscars, is thinking. Sure, last year’s best feature Gotham winner, Birdman, went on to win the best picture Oscar, and this year’s, Spotlight, might well do the same. (That’s two Michael Keaton movies, for those of you counting at home!) But it’s important to understand why that sort of thing is coincidental, as opposed to correlative.

The Gotham Awards, which are hosted by the Independent Film Project (IFP) and honor low-budget American films, recognize nominees and winners that are chosen by committees of just four or five people — journalists in the first round, filmmakers in the second. So when, say, The Diary of a Teenage Girl lands a field-leading four noms, as it did this year, that is not indicative of the entire indie film community’s preferences (rival Film Independent’s Spirit Awards are more reflective of that), but rather of the tastes of a small handful of people who happened to be asked to weigh in on a specific category.

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Monday November 30th, 2015

Can ‘Spotlight’ Score the Rare Oscar Hat Trick?

By Patrick Shanley
Managing Editor

Director Tom McCarthy’s true story drama about Boston Globe reporters investigating the local Catholic archdiocese and the surrounding child molestation scandal, Spotlight, is a serious Oscar contender, particularly for its star-studded cast.

The film, which won the best ensemble performance award at this month’s Gotham Awards and the Robert Altman award at the Independent Spirit Awards, boasts serious contenders in the best supporting actor category led by performances from last year’s best actor nominee Michael Keaton and former Oscar-nom Mark Ruffalo.

It seems likely that both Keaton and Ruffalo will receive nominations this year, which would be quite a feat in itself as no film has had two of its actors nominated in the best supporting actor category since Harvey Keitel and Ben Kingsley both earned noms for 1991’s Bugsy (though the supporting actress category has had a number of films with double noms over the past decade).

If Spotlight manages to earn nominations for three of its stars (and a strong case can be made for Liev Schreiber’s and Stanley Tucci’s performances), it will be only the sixth film in Oscars history to do so.

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Monday November 23rd, 2015

Biopics are Topic du Jour, Acting Frontrunners Play Real-Life Figures

By Patrick Shanley
Managing Editor

This year’s Oscar hopefuls boasts the largest roster of biopics in recent memory. From more traditional, straight-forward affairs such as Straight Outta Compton and Black Mass, to films that focus on one particular real-life event such as The Big Short and Spotlight, to less typical takes focused on separate periods in the subjects’ lives such as Steve Jobs and Love & Mercy, this year’s films cover the entire spectrum of the biopic genre.

As a result, many of the frontrunners in the four major acting categories are for performances portraying real-life people. Looking back on the Academy’s history, it is hard to find a year in which an acting award did not go to a performer portraying a real person. Eddie Redmayne, Matthew McConaughey, and Daniel Day-Lewis (the last three best actor winners) all starred in biographical films.

This year the trend looks to continue, yet the field is so overwhelmingly bio-heavy that it may very well see all four acting winners awarded for real-life portrayals.

Here’s a look at stars in the hunt for Oscars this year who star in biopic films:

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Thursday October 29th, 2015

SAG Awards’ Best Ensemble Helps Predict Oscar Winners

By Patrick Shanley
Managing Editor

The SAG Awards are one of the great indicators of who may be looking at walking the stage at the Oscars to receive a statuette. In particular, SAG’s ensemble award has often been presented to casts that have later gone on to receive nominations, and wins, from the Academy.

This year there are a number of films with star-studded casts who look to make the SAG voters task difficult. Possible best picture contenders SpotlightThe Big Short, Joy, and The Martian  all boast stellar casts featuring Oscar winners.

Spotlight, which many theorists have as their best picture frontrunner at the moment, was just awarded the best ensemble prize at the Gotham Awards. The film features Oscar nominees Mark Ruffalo, Stanley Tucciand last year’s best actor nominee Michael Keaton. Keaton’s close loss to Eddie Redmayne last year may prompt the Academy to show him some extra love this season.

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Thursday September 17th, 2015

Journalism a Hot Subject of Festival Films

By Patrick Shanley
Managing Editor

Journalists have always made for captivating subjects for films and this year’s festival entries are no exceptions.

Truth, which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival, details the last days of CBS news anchor Dan Rather (played by Robert Redford) after his controversial broadcast that President George W. Bush received preferential treatment to avoid fighting in the Vietnam War. The film also stars Cate Blanchett and Mad Men‘s Elisabeth Moss. The film’s focus on controversial subject matter, buoyed by strong performances by its stars, could translate into success come awards season.

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Thursday January 1st, 2015

Scott Feinberg’s Top 10 Films of 2014


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

With just hours remaining in 2014, I wanted to document for myself — and share with you — the films that I enjoyed the most this year. I have seen hundreds of titles — on the big screen and on screeners, at festivals and at multiplexes — among them all of the top Oscar contenders, up to and including every film on the documentary and foreign language film shortlists. In other words, I have done my best to be well-versed in what’s out there — but, needless to say, no list of this sort is anything but a subjective exercise for anyone.

It pains me that I do not have room to acknowledge, on the list itself, more of 2014’s extraordinary films (i.e. the 12-year project Boyhood, the acting showcases Birdman and The Imitation Game, the timely Selma and films both profound and moving, such as Citizenfour, Finding Vivian Maier and Leviathan, and funny, such as The Humbling and Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon); performances (i.e. Selma’s David Oyelowo, Still Alice’s Julianne Moore, Get On Up’s Chadwick Boseman, Dear White People’s Tessa Thompson,The Skeleton Twins’ Bill Hader, Fort Bliss’ Michelle Monaghan, The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby’s Jessica Chastain); and scenes (i.e. the silent sparring in Foxcatcher, the highway showdown in A Most Violent Year, the firing of a man for being gay in Love Is Strange, the courtroom speech in Black or White and the pantomimed soccer game in Timbuktu) — so I’ve taken the liberty of doing so here in the intro.

The last thing that I’ll note, for those who primarily follow me for my objective assessments of the awards race, is that the list that the following list and remarks reflect my personal opinions and do/will not in any way impact my projections or analysis on this site, through which I strive above all else to accurately report what has happened and forecast what will happen. My demonstrated ability to do that over the years is what has led many of you to my coverage, and any failure on my part to do that would undoubtedly lead many of you away from it, so you can rest assured that I mean it when I say that one has/will have no bearing on the other.

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Friday November 14th, 2014

‘Big Eyes’ Debuts, ‘Foxcatcher’ Finally Makes It to AFI Fest on Busy Night in Awards Season


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

On Thursday night, two very different Oscar hopefuls, which have tread two very different paths, both landed in Hollywood for the first time.

Bennett Miller’s Foxcatcher, a dark drama that was originally scheduled to have its world premiere at the AFI Fest last year before post-production delays forced it into this year’s race, finally made it to the fest (better late than never!), having already screened at just about every other biggie (Cannes, Telluride, Toronto and New York). The film, which stars Steve Carell, Channing Tatum and Mark Ruffalo, was feted with a gala Los Angeles premiere at the home of the Oscars, the Dolby Theatre, to which Sony Classics hopes it will return as an Oscar nominee on Feb. 22.

Meanwhile, across town, Tim Burton’s Big Eyes, a biopic-dramedy that stars Academy favorites Amy Adams and Christoph Waltz as married artists Margaret Keane and Walter Keane, had its world premiere at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The Weinstein Co. release screened as part of a Film Independent screening series — FI’s Elvis Mitchell noted, in pre-screening remarks, that it was the series’ first-ever world premiere — which struck some as an unusual way to unveil an awards hopeful, although it proved to be perfectly reasonable. It effectively managed hype and expectations, making it possible for the glossy film to more or less satisfy rather than disappoint its audience.

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Friday September 19th, 2014

Britannia Awards to Honor Robert Downey Jr., Mark Ruffalo and Mike Leigh

By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

The Judge‘s lead actor Robert Downey, Jr., Foxcatcher‘s supporting actor Mark Ruffalo, Mr. Turner‘s writer-director Mike Leigh and two beloved British actresses of different generations, Dame Judi Dench and Emma Watson, will be this year’s honorees at BAFTA Los Angeles’ 23rd annual Britannia Awards on Oct. 30 at the Beverly Hilton, the organization announced Thursday.

The gala dinner and ceremony, which raises funds for BAFTA-LA’s education, preservation and philanthropic efforts, is an early and high-profile stop on the annual awards circuit that fetes Brits and non-Brits alike “who have dedicated their careers to advancing the art forms of the moving image in the US, UK and beyond.”

Comedian Rob Brydon will return as host for the second consecutive year. (The ceremony will air on BBC America on  Nov 2 at 9pm EST.) And BAFTA’s Bumble Ward and Deborah Kolar will serve as the event’s co-chairs.

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Monday September 1st, 2014

Telluride: ‘Foxcatcher’ Lands Stateside, Trio of Actors Strongly Embraced


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

Bennett Miller‘s first two feature films, Capote (2005) and Moneyball (2011), were both nominated for the best picture Oscar. His third, Foxcatcher, has already garnered him the best director prize at May’s Cannes Film Festival. But if Foxcatcher is to follow in the footsteps of Miller’s earlier films, it will have to resonate stateside, too, which is why so much attention was paid to its North American premiere at the Telluride Film Festival on Saturday morning.

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