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Posts Tagged ‘Robert Redford’

Friday December 25th, 2015

‘Awards Chatter’ Podcast — Dan Rather (‘Truth’)

The legendary TV newsman, now 84, reflects on his life, the state of news and the controversy that ended his career at CBS News and inspired a film: "I didn't think then, I haven't thought since then and I don't think now there was any reasonable doubt about the documents."

By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

“I recognize that I set before you a reputation,” says Dan Rather,the legendary TV newsman who is portrayed by Robert Redfordin the divisive new film Truth, as we sit down to record an episode of my ‘Awards Chatter’ podcast. “I’ve made my mistakes and have my wounds, some of them open, some of them self-inflicted. A lot of that comes from covering controversial stories. You cover the Civil Rights movement at a time when it’s a very controversial movement, you cover the Vietnam War, you cover the widespread criminal conspiracy known as Watergate, and a certain segment of partisan political American life says, ‘This guy — he’s got an agenda!’ My own agenda — all it’s ever been — is to try to bear witness to what I see.”

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Thursday October 1st, 2015

Where Your Film is Set May Be an Issue for Oscar Hopefuls

By Patrick Shanley
Managing Editor

With the 53rd New York Film Festival well under way, many east coast Academy members are enjoying films that hope to earn some attention at this year’s awards. The widely-held public assumption, however, is that the majority of Academy voters reside on the west coast.

Possibly as a result of this belief, many Oscar contenders are set in and around Hollywood. Best picture winners Argo, The Artist, and Crash are recent examples with major plotlines revolving around Los Angeles.

Yet, this year, there are serious Oscar hopefuls set in other major American cities. Could this shift in locale be disastrous with the largely west coast-based Academy?

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Thursday September 24th, 2015

The Problem With Multiple Oscar-Worthy Performances for Cate Blanchett

By Patrick Shanley
Managing Editor

Cate Blanchett is no stranger to the Oscars. The Australian-born actress has two statues already, as well as three other nominations, and is hoping to add to that award season resume this year with buzz surrounding both Carol, a 1950’s-set period drama about a lesbian relationship between a department store clerk (Rooney Mara) and her relationship with a married woman (Blanchett), and Truth, the story of Dan Rather‘s (Robert Redford) dismissal from CBS’ 60 Minutes following investigations into president George W. Bush‘s military service.

This year Blanchett appears in two buzzed about films, Carol and Truth. Blanchett lost out to costar Marat for the best actress award at Cannes earlier this year. In Truth, she could possibly push to get nominated for the lead position in that film while also pushing for a nomination for her work in Carol. Double nominations is an area, as we will explore below, Blanchett knows well.

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Friday September 18th, 2015

TIFF: ’60 Minutes’ Takes Another Big Screen Beating in ‘Truth’ — But Is It Justified?

THR's awards analyst mulls over the new Oscar hopeful about 'Rather-gate,' which stars Cate Blanchett and Robert Redford, and wonders what to make of a film that argues its protagonists were unfairly targeted.

By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

THR’s awards analyst mulls over the new Oscar hopeful about ‘Rather-gate,’ which stars Cate Blanchett and Robert Redford, and wonders what to make of a film that argues its protagonists were unfairly targeted.

When I was in junior high and serving as the editor of my school paper, I met, through a relative, a man who worked as a producer at the iconic CBS news-magazine 60 Minutes. He was kind enough to take an interest in an aspiring journalist and invited me to spend a day with him at the network’s headquarters in New York. There, he walked me through 60 Minutes‘ offices, past the editorial conference rooms and editing bays and even down into the surprisingly small rooms where correspondents tape the show’s iconic segment-intros in front of a green screen, onto which is later added an image, producer credits and a ticking clock.

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Thursday September 17th, 2015

Journalism a Hot Subject of Festival Films

By Patrick Shanley
Managing Editor

Journalists have always made for captivating subjects for films and this year’s festival entries are no exceptions.

Truth, which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival, details the last days of CBS news anchor Dan Rather (played by Robert Redford) after his controversial broadcast that President George W. Bush received preferential treatment to avoid fighting in the Vietnam War. The film also stars Cate Blanchett and Mad Men‘s Elisabeth Moss. The film’s focus on controversial subject matter, buoyed by strong performances by its stars, could translate into success come awards season.

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Sunday February 9th, 2014

Santa Barbara Film Fest: Robert Redford Reluctantly Reflects on a Great Career


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

If Friday night’s Santa Barbara International Film Festival tribute to Robert Redfordtaught us anything, it is that the legendary actor-director-festival founder is a man of his word. The 77-year-old agreed to come to the fest to participate in a Q&A and accept the American Riviera Award back in Dec., when it looked like a sure thing that he would receive a best actor Oscar nomination for All Is Lost. When that did not happen in Jan., he could have understandably, if disappointingly, pulled out, as some others who were Oscar-snubbed did this year and in years past. But, as an old showbiz pro and a man who knows how tough it is to put together a festival, he did not want to leave someone else hanging and not only showed up but provided one of the more exciting and fascinating evenings of the fest’s 29th edition.

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Tuesday January 14th, 2014

Potential Nominees Who Are Overdue for Oscar Wins

By Mark Pinkert
Contributor

One of the most popular Oscar hopefuls this year is Bruce Dern, who has gotten a lot of love from critics and from his peers for a great performance in Alexander Payne’s Nebraska. But, other than the role itself, what has made his story so special is that he’s had an extremely prolific film career–mostly as a supporting actor–and is finally getting Oscar recognition for the first time at the age of 77.  (Dern did get nominated for Best Supporting Actor thirty-five years ago for Coming Home (1978).) Even getting a nomination, though, will be an uphill battle, as he’s in a tight race with the likes of Tom Hanks, Leonardo DiCaprio, Chiwetel Ejiofor, and Matthew McConaughey.

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Saturday January 11th, 2014

The Academy Awards: No Country for Old Men, or Women?


By Mark Pinkert
Contributor

At the ripe age of 79, Judi Dench could become the second oldest woman to win the Academy Award for Best Actress. She’s a likely nominee by way of Philomena (2013), a British comedy-drama in which Philomena Lee (Dench) pairs up with an out-of-work journalist, Martin Sixsmith (Steve Coogan), to find the son she was forced to give up 50 years earlier. An Academy win would make Dench the second oldest Best Actress behind only Jessica Tandy, who won the award at the age of 80 as Mrs. Daisy Werthan in Driving Miss Daisy (1989), and only the third Best Actress to receive the award while over the age of 65 (Katharine Hepburn won for On Golden Pond (1981) when she was 74 years old).

Dench–known more for her icy, matriarchal roles–is illuminated and humorous in Philomena, and she handles this role with great dexterity. But while she’s an almost guaranteed Best Actress nom, the film itself seems to be on the Best Picture bubble, and will have a tough time squeezing past the likes of Inside Llewyn Davis or Dallas Buyers Club. This despite the fact that the Academy voting body is notoriously known for being very old and very white, and often voting that way.

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Sunday December 29th, 2013

2014 Oscars: Actors on the Campaign Trail

By Mark Pinkert
Contributor

Studios and actors have campaigned for Oscars in the past, but never as fervently and persistently as they do these days. Competition is the new norm, and it’s mostly credited to Harvey Weinstein, who politicized Oscar season in the 1990s while working as the head of Miramax Films. Weinstein was rumored to have used coercion, subterfuge, and even bribery to get his films into Oscar contention–the verity of these rumors is debatable; what is known, though, is that he spent exorbitant amounts of money and was somehow able to will Shakespeare in Love, for instance, past Life is Beautiful and Saving Private Ryanin the 1998 Best Picture race.

In order to stay competitive, other distributors had to follow suit and, as a result, Oscar season has become an expensive festival of cocktail parties, dinners, screenings, honorary awards, ad campaigns, and the like. “Buzz” is the word, and it even seems that less emphasis has been placed on the work between “action” and “cut.” This is true for actors especially, who are commissioned by studios to travel the country and serve as the primary promoters of the film.

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Thursday December 19th, 2013

Robert Redford and Whether One Must Campaign to Win an Oscar

By Terence Johnson
Managing Editor

To campaign or to not campaign? Tis the question posed to actors every year any time their performances warrant any kind of awards consideration. Robert Redford is certainly being confronted with this question given that he finds himself in contention for Best Actor in the tightest race we’ve seen in a while. But should he be doing more? The answer to that question is something worth looking into.

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