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Posts Tagged ‘Sam Rockwell’

Tuesday January 22nd, 2013

‘The Way, Way Back’ Acquired By Fox Searchlight

By Vitale Morum
Hollywood News

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Fox Searchlight Pictures Presidents Nancy Utley and Stephen Gilula announced today that the company has acquired rights to North America as well as most major territories to the heartfelt comedy The Way, Way Back. Directed and written by Academy Award winners Nat Faxon and Jim Rash, The Way, Way Back stars Steve Carell, Toni Collette, Sam Rockwell, Allison Janney, Maya Rudolph, AnnaSophia Robb, Amanda Peet and Liam James.

Tuesday September 25th, 2012

Hollywood Film Awards to Honor ‘Silver Linings Playbook’ Star Robert De Niro

By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

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The Hollywood Reporter  has learned that Robert De Niro, the legendary two-time Oscar winner who is now in serious contention for his first Oscar nomination in 21 years for his performance in David O. Russell‘s dramedy Silver Linings Playbook, will receive the Hollywood Supporting Actor Award at the 16th annual Hollywood Film Awards — the first awards show of the 2012 Oscar season — when its gala ceremony is held Oct. 22 at the Beverly Hilton.

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Wednesday February 9th, 2011

“DEEP VOTE” ON “CASINO JACK,” “HEREAFTER,” AND “IRON MAN 2″

Deep Vote,” an Oscar winning screenwriter and a member of the Academy, will write this column — exclusively for ScottFeinberg.com — every week until the Academy Awards in order to help to peel back the curtain on the Oscar voting process. (His identity must be protected in order to spare him from repercussions for disclosing the aforementioned information.)

Thus far, he has shared his thoughts in column 1 about his general preferences; column 2 about “Solitary Man” (Anchor Bay Films, 5/21, R, trailer) and Winter’s Bone” (Roadside Attractions, 6/11, R, trailer); column 3 about Alice in Wonderland” (Disney, 3/5, PG, trailer), Mother and Child” (Sony Pictures Classics, 5/7, R, trailer), and Toy Story 3” (Disney, 6/18, G, trailer); column 4 about Get Low” (Sony Pictures Classics, 7/30, PG-13, trailer), “The Kids Are All Right” (Focus Features, 7/9, R, trailer), and “The Social Network” (Columbia, 10/1, PG-13, trailer); column 5 about “127 Hours” (Fox Searchlight, 11/5, R, trailer), “Biutiful” (Roadside Attractions, 12/17, R, trailer), and “Shutter Island” (Paramount, 2/19, R, trailer); column 6 about Inception” (Warner Brothers, 7/16, PG-13, trailer), “Made in Dagenham” (Sony Pictures Classics, 11/19, R, trailer), and “Somewhere” (Focus Features, 12/22, R, trailer); column 7 about Another Year” (Sony Pictures Classics, 12/29, PG-13, trailer), “Fair Game” (Summit, 11/5, PG-13, trailer), and “Rabbit Hole” (Lionsgate, 12/17, PG-13, trailer); column 8 about Blue Valentine” (The Weinstein Company, 12/29, R, trailer), “The Fighter” (Paramount, 12/10, R, trailer), and “True Grit” (Paramount, 12/22, PG-13, trailer); column 9 about The Ghost Writer” (Summit, 2/19, PG-13, trailer), The King’s Speech” (The Weinstein Company, 11/26, R, trailer), and “The Town” (Warner Brothers, 9/17, R, trailer); column 10 about Black Swan” (Fox Searchlight, 12/3, R, trailer), “Conviction” (Fox Searchlight, 10/15, R, trailer), and “I Am Love” (Magnolia, 6/18, R, trailer); column 11 about his nomination ballots; column 12 about All Good Things” (Magnolia, 12/3, R, trailer), “Animal Kingdom” (Sony Pictures Classics, 8/13, R, trailer), and “The Way Back” (Newmarket, 12/29, PG-13, trailer); column 13 about Barney’s Version” (Sony Pictures Classics, 12/3, R, trailer), “Love and Other Drugs” (20th Century Fox, 11/24, R, trailer), and “Tangled” (Disney, 11/24, PG, trailer); and column 14 about The Illusionist” (Sony Pictures Classics, 12/25, PG, trailer), “Inside Job” (Sony Pictures Classics, 10/8, PG-13, trailer), “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (Warner Brothers, 11/19, PG-13, trailer), and “How to Train Your Dragon” (DreamWorks Animation, 3/26, PG, trailer).

This week, he assesses three more films: “Casino Jack” (ATO Pictures, 12/17, R, trailer), “Hereafter” (Warner Brothers, 10/22, PG-13, trailer), and “Iron Man 2” (Paramount, 5/7, PG-13, trailer). The first brought Kevin Spacey a Golden Globe nomination for best actor (drama); the latter two are nominated for the best visual effects Oscar.

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Friday January 7th, 2011

INTERVIEW: SAM ROCKWELL, AN ACTOR WITH CHARACTER (AND “CONVICTION”)

On Tuesday afternoon, I had the opportunity to chat by phone for about 30 minutes with the veteran character actor Sam Rockwell, who has generated some of the best reviews of his career — and not inconsiderable buzz for a best supporting actor Oscar nod, which would be his first in any category — for his performance in Tony Goldwyn’s “Conviction.”

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO AUDIO OF OUR CONVERSATION!

Rockwell, 42, portrays Kenny Waters, a real person with a checkered background who was sentenced to life in prison for a murder that he — and, to an even greater degree, his sister (Hilary Swank) — insisted he did not commit. (It’s a part, he tells me, that Eric Bana, Colin Farrell, Philip Seymour Hoffman, and John C. Reilly all passed on!) Though some have argued that the film plays like a Lifetime TV movie or an extended episode of “Law & Order,” precious few have had anything but kind things to say about Rockwell, who convincingly portrays Waters as both a young and carefree rabble-rouser and 18 years later as an aged and hardened convict whose will to live is slipping away.

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Tuesday January 4th, 2011

“DEEP VOTE” ON “BLACK SWAN,” “CONVICTION,” AND “I AM LOVE”

Deep Vote,” an Oscar winning screenwriter and a member of the Academy, will write this column — exclusively for ScottFeinberg.com — every week until the Academy Awards. He will help to peel back the curtain on the Oscar voting process by sharing his thoughts about the films he sees and, ultimately, his nomination and final ballots, as well. His identity must be protected in order to spare him from repercussions for disclosing the aforementioned information.

Thus far, he has shared his thoughts in column one about his general preferences; column two about Winter’s Bone” (Roadside Attractions, 6/11, R, trailer) and Solitary Man” (Anchor Bay Films, 5/21, R, trailer); column three about Alice in Wonderland” (Disney, 3/5, PG, trailer), “Toy Story 3” (Disney, 6/18, G, trailer), and “Mother and Child” (Sony Pictures Classics, 5/7, R, trailer); column four about Get Low” (Sony Pictures Classics, 7/30, PG-13, trailer), “The Kids Are All Right” (Focus Features, 7/9, R, trailer), and “The Social Network” (Columbia, 10/1, PG-13, trailer); column five about “127 Hours” (Fox Searchlight, 11/5, R, trailer), “Biutiful” (Roadside Attractions, 12/17, R, trailer), and “Shutter Island” (Paramount, 2/19, R, trailer); column six about Inception” (Warner Brothers, 7/16, PG-13, trailer), “Made in Dagenham” (Sony Pictures Classics, 11/19, R, trailer), and “Somewhere” (Focus Features, 12/22, R, trailer); column seven about Another Year” (Sony Pictures Classics, 12/29, PG-13, trailer), “Fair Game” (Summit, 11/5, PG-13, trailer), and “Rabbit Hole” (Lionsgate, 12/17, PG-13, trailer); column eight about Blue Valentine” (The Weinstein Company, 12/29, R, trailer), “The Fighter” (Paramount, 12/10, R, trailer), and “True Grit” (Paramount, 12/22, PG-13, trailer); and column nine about The Ghost Writer” (Summit, 2/19, PG-13, trailer), The King’s Speech” (The Weinstein Company, 11/26, R, trailer), and “The Town” (Warner Brothers, 9/17, R, trailer).

This week, he assesses three more awards hopefuls: “Black Swan” (Fox Searchlight, 12/3, R, trailer), “Conviction” (Fox Searchlight, 10/15, R, trailer), and “I Am Love” (Magnolia, 6/18, R, trailer)

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Thursday December 16th, 2010

BREAKING DOWN THE SAG NODS: KEY STATS, INCLUSIONS, SNUBS

Key Factoids

Noteworthy Inclusions

  • Conviction” star Hilary Swank, who had largely dropped off most pundits’ best actress radar — especially after being snubbed earlier this week by the HFPA, which loves movie stars and has extra slots to fill with in its lead acting categories — was the least expected nominee of the day.
  • Mila Kunis, who until recently was best known as a star of “That ’70s Show” and a voice on “Family Guy,” was nominated for best supporting actress for her breakthrough performance in “Black Swan.” That, along with the Golden Globes nod that she received on Tuesday, means she is overwhelmingly likely to receive an Oscar nod next month, as well.

Noteworthy Snubs

  • Ryan Gosling and Michelle Williams, the stars of the gritty, low-budget actors’ vehicle “Blue Valentine,” were somewhat surprisingly passed over in the best actor and best actress categories, respectively, just two days after both received Golden Globe nods.
  • Matt Damon, the A-list star who took on a supporting role in “True Grit,” was not nominated for best supporting actor even though his co-stars Jeff Bridges and Hailee Steinfeld scored nods for best actor and best supporting actress, respectively, and Sam Rockwell, the veteran character actor who plays a pivotal character in “Conviction,” was not nominated for best supporting actor even though his co-star Hilary Swank scored a nod for best actress.

Photo: Geoffrey Rush in “The King’s Speech.” Credit: The Weinstein Company.

Wednesday October 27th, 2010

FLASH: SEAN PENN GOES SUPPORTING

I learned today that Sean Penn, who has won the best actor Oscar twice during the past decade, will be pushed in the best supporting actor category for his performance as former ambassador Joe Wilson in Doug Liman’s “Fair Game” (Summit, 11/5, trailer).

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Wednesday October 27th, 2010

YOUR DAILY FIX OF OSCAR: 10/27/10

  • Deadline Hollywood: Pete Hammond writes up the 14th annual Hollywood Awards, which “drew an impressive star turnout” Monday evening at the Beverly Hilton. The honorees included the following: best actor Robert Duvall (“Get Low”), best actress Annette Bening (“The Kids Are All Right”), best supporting actor Sam Rockwell (“Conviction”), best supporting actress Helena Bonham Carter (“The King’s Speech”), best director Tom Hooper (“The King’s Speech”), best producers Danny Boyle and Christian Colson (“127 Hours”), and the cast of “The Social Network,” which won best ensemble.
  • Gold Derby: Tom O’Neil reports that the latest DVD screener to arrive in Academy members’ mailboxes — on the heels of “Animal Kingdom” and “Mother and Child” (9/29) and “City Island,” “Please Give,” “Solitary Man,” and “You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger” (10/15) — is Debra Granik’s “Winter’s Bone,” which showed up for most of them on Friday. As you may recall, the film received a field-leading three nominations for the Gotham Independent Film Awards last week and was released on DVD yesterday.
  • The Wrap: Steve Pond learns that concerns raised yesterday by Guy Lodge about the Oscar eligibility of “Frankie and Alice” were unwarranted. Pond obtained emails that show the film’s production company contacted the Academy in November 2009 seeking details about the submission process, but the following month — after the Academy’s “reminder list” had been published with “Frankie and Alice” on it — “informed [them] that the film would not be opening in 2009 after all.” Academy spokesman Leslie Unger confirms that merely “having been included on the list last year” — as opposed to having had a one-week qualifying run on at least one screen in New York and Los Angeles — “does not disqualify it.”
  • In Contention: Guy Lodge wishes that the Academy would lighten up and give a best actress nod to Emma Stone for her “frisky, funny and stealthily wise performance” in “Easy A,” a “bubbly teen comedy,” but acknowledges that they rarely recognize “unadulterated comic fluff” in the category — indeed, one has to go back almost a decade to find the last time they did, when Renee Zellweger snuck in for “Bridget Jones’s Diary” (2001). As Guy puts it, “when the dish goes down that easily, one can forget how much expertise goes into making it rise.”
  • Movie Line: S.T. VanAirsdale performs a post-mortem on “Hereafter,” the clunky drama written by Peter Morgan and directed by Clint Eastwood — both highly-respected Oscar winners — that has received a luke-warm critical and commercial response. After reviewing the evidence, VanAirsdale divides the blame between both men: that the root of the problem, he says, was Eastwood’s rush to turn Morgan’s screenplay into a film (even though Morgan says it was a rough draft written “very sketchily” and “in a disgracefully short period”), and Morgan’s willingness to let him do so before he was pleased with it.
  • Hollywood-Elsewhere: Jeff Wells surveys the Oscar punditocracy to try to establish whether or not “I Am Love” star Tilda Swinton might snag a best actress nod for her performance in the two-hour-long subtitled Italian film. (Scott told him, “She has a very real shot… she’s very popular among her fellow actors, who admire her fiercely independent streak on-screen and off.”) Swinton’s rep told Wells that in a few weeks “she will be in L.A. for a big round of screenings and then on to New York” and that “Magnolia will be sending screeners to the entire Academy, SAG nominating committee, and HFPA, for starters.”
  • Time: Nate Jones interviews Sir Michael Caine, who is currently making the rounds promoting his newly-released memoirs “The Elephant to Hollywood,” and asks him several questions about the director Christopher Nolan, with whom Caine has collaborated on four films over the last six years — “Batman Begins” (2005), “The Prestige” (2006), “The Dark Knight” (2008), and “Inception” (2010) — and challenges him to explain “Inception” in just one sentence, to which Caine offers the tremendously helpful response, “If I’m in a scene, it’s real; if I’m not, it’s not.”
  • Politics Daily: Bonnie Goldstein notes that last Wednesday, just days after President Barack Obama hosted director Davis Guggenheim and the young subjects of his doc “Waiting for ‘Superman’” at the White House, the president’s half-sister Maya Soetoro-Ng — a “lifelong educator” (she was a high school history teacher and university instructor in Hawaii)” – wrote “an unsolicited email to her friends and family” urging them to see the film, which she believes will “help people to see the importance of graceful negotiation when trying to change a system and recognize the true power of persuasion.”
  • Deadline New York: Mike Fleming confirms that the Film Independent Spirit Awards (aka the “Indie Spirit Awards”), “one of the most enjoyable Oscar weekend events,” will be returning to the beach in Santa Monica and the Saturday before Oscars Sunday, just as it was held for years prior to last year — its 25th anniversary — when it was relocated to downtown Los Angeles and held on the Friday before Oscars Sunday.

Photo: Emma Stone in “Easy A.” Credit: Screen Gems.

Wednesday October 6th, 2010

YOUR DAILY FIX OF OSCAR: 10/6/10

  • The Playlist: Kevin Jagernauth reports that the organizers of the Academy Awards are exploring the possibility of moving up the 2012 ceremony to January as part of “a continuing effort to boost flagging viewership.” It would, however, face “considerable competition from the last weeks of the NFL season” and “the window to get out screeners” would become very condensed (which has prompted discussion about a secure Web site through which members could instantly access films online).
  • CNN: Larry King announces that he will devote the full hour of tonight’s “Larry King Live” to the new film “Conviction,” another huge coup for the folks at Fox Searchlight. Guests will include the film’s director Tony Goldwyn; stars Hilary Swank, Sam Rockwell, and Minnie Driver; and real-life inspirations Betty Anne Waters, Abra Rice, and Barry Scheck. Also appearing will be 12 individuals from across the country who were convicted of crimes they did not commit, and who were eventually exonerated thanks to the efforts of The Innocence Project.
  • IFC News: Allison Willmore offers a great rebuttal to Rebecca Davis O’Brien’s complaints about the portrayal of women in “The Social Network,” asserting that the film doesn’t have a problem with women, but rather its characters do. “It’s a story about guys,” she writes. “Desperate, socially inept guys. It’s a cinematic sausage fest!”
  • In Contention: Kris Tapley, who has championed Peter Weir’s “The Way Back” since seeing it at Telluride, is pleased to report that the newly-formed shingle Wrekin Hill Entertainment, in partnership with Newmarket Films, will provide the film with a one-week Oscar qualifying run in December prior to releasing in in select theaters on January 21, 2011.
  • Los Angeles Times: Patrick Goldstein describes “The Social Network” as “an old-fashioned writer’s picture, a quintessential Aaron Sorkin story crammed full of dazzling dialogue, audacious characters and a rich smorgasbord of moral issues worthy of prolonged debate,” and argues that the reason there are so few other films like it is because television is now a much more welcoming medium for writers. Sorkin concurs, telling Goldstein, “If Herman Mankiewicz, Billy Wilder, Preston Sturges, and Budd Schulberg were alive today, they’d be writing on TV.”
  • Los Angeles Times: Steven Zeitchik recounts “The Social Network” screenwriter Aaron Sorkin’s controversial remarks on the debut episode of CNN’s “Parker Spitzer” — “Sarah Palin is an idiot… a remarkably, stunningly, jaw-droppingly incompetent, mean woman… the Democrats have moved to the center, but the Republicans have moved into a mental institution”  — and wonders if it will impact the film’s performance  at the box-office.
  • TV Hunter: Hunter Walker learns that the cable network FX has purchased the broadcast rights to two recently released films, “The Social Network” and “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps,” adding them to a stable of recent acquisitions that also includes “The A-Team,” “Date Night,” “The Karate Kid,” and “Salt.”
  • The New Republic: Lawrence Lessig, a Harvard law professor, calls “The Social Network” a “deeply, deeply flawed film,” but his gripe actually seems to be more with the shortcomings of the American legal system and the things that the film does not address than with the film itself.

Photo: Minnie Driver and Hilary Swank in “Conviction.” Credit: Fox Searchlight.

Tuesday September 28th, 2010

VIDEO: PRISON EXONEREES ENDORSE “CONVICTION” DURING MOVING Q&A

Last night, following a special screening of “Conviction” (Fox Searchlight, 10/15, trailer) in Boston that was put together for The New England Innocence Project, I moderated a Q&A with the film’s director, Tony Goldwyn, a class act who I know through our common alma mater; one of its stars, Sam Rockwell, who plays Kenny Waters, a man who was sentenced to life in prison for a crime he did not commit; and the woman who inspired it in the first place, Betty Anne Waters, Kenny’s sister, who spent 18 years of her life fighting to exonerate him.

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