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Posts Tagged ‘The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford’

Tuesday January 14th, 2014

Potential Nominees Who Are Overdue for Oscar Wins

By Mark Pinkert
Contributor

One of the most popular Oscar hopefuls this year is Bruce Dern, who has gotten a lot of love from critics and from his peers for a great performance in Alexander Payne’s Nebraska. But, other than the role itself, what has made his story so special is that he’s had an extremely prolific film career–mostly as a supporting actor–and is finally getting Oscar recognition for the first time at the age of 77.  (Dern did get nominated for Best Supporting Actor thirty-five years ago for Coming Home (1978).) Even getting a nomination, though, will be an uphill battle, as he’s in a tight race with the likes of Tom Hanks, Leonardo DiCaprio, Chiwetel Ejiofor, and Matthew McConaughey.

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Monday February 14th, 2011

THE UNACKNOWLEDGED REALITY OF THE BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY OSCAR RACE

Why was I projecting that the best cinematography Oscar would go to Wally Pfister (“Inception”) rather than Roger Deakins (“True Grit”) even before this evening’s announcement that Pfister had topped Deakins to win the American Society of Cinematographers’ ASC Award? For one very simple reason: neither Pfister’s nor Deakins’s name will actually be on the Oscar ballot.

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Friday January 7th, 2011

INTERVIEW: SAM ROCKWELL, AN ACTOR WITH CHARACTER (AND “CONVICTION”)

On Tuesday afternoon, I had the opportunity to chat by phone for about 30 minutes with the veteran character actor Sam Rockwell, who has generated some of the best reviews of his career — and not inconsiderable buzz for a best supporting actor Oscar nod, which would be his first in any category — for his performance in Tony Goldwyn’s “Conviction.”

CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO AUDIO OF OUR CONVERSATION!

Rockwell, 42, portrays Kenny Waters, a real person with a checkered background who was sentenced to life in prison for a murder that he — and, to an even greater degree, his sister (Hilary Swank) — insisted he did not commit. (It’s a part, he tells me, that Eric Bana, Colin Farrell, Philip Seymour Hoffman, and John C. Reilly all passed on!) Though some have argued that the film plays like a Lifetime TV movie or an extended episode of “Law & Order,” precious few have had anything but kind things to say about Rockwell, who convincingly portrays Waters as both a young and carefree rabble-rouser and 18 years later as an aged and hardened convict whose will to live is slipping away.

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Sunday December 26th, 2010

SCOTT FEINBERG’S TOP 10 FILMS OF ’10

PLEASE NOTE: The following rankings and remarks reflect my personal opinions and do/will not in any way impact my projections or analysis on this site, wherein I strive above all else to correctly forecast what will happen, not what I believe should happen. My demonstrated ability to do that over the years is what has led most of you to my site, and any failure to do that will undoubtedly lead you away from it, so you can rest assured that I mean it when I say that one has/will have no bearing on the other.

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Monday September 6th, 2010

WHY THE 2007 TIFF WAS THE BEST YET

By John H. Foote, ScottFeinberg.com contributor
(and former director of the Toronto Film School)

In 2007, four of the five films that were eventually nominated for the best picture Oscar screened at the Toronto International Film Festival, along with numerous other films that went on to score nominations in other categories. “No Country for Old Men” would win the Oscar for best picture over fellow TIFF films “Atonement,” “Juno,” and “Michael Clayton,” as well as “There Will Be Blood” (which was not screened until well after the festival), but to be honest I left nearly every TIFF film that I saw that year with the sense that I had seen one of the year’s best pictures.

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