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Countdown to Oscars

Posts Tagged ‘Tom Hiddleston’

Monday April 23rd, 2012

Why Some Comic Adaptations Failed: ‘Iron Man 2,’ ‘Punisher: War Zone,’ ‘Superman Returns,’ ‘Hulk’

By Scott Mendelson

Actor Tom Hiddleston wrote an eloquent essay yesterday for The Guardian basically praising and defending the sub-genre known as the superhero picture. Plenty of disdain for the genre comes from the very notion that it’s big-budget entertainment based on literature that was technically intended for children that gobbles up production dollars and screen space that otherwise might be allotted for more explicitly grown-up fare. But at least some of the alleged weariness of this specific type of film (the superhero comic book adaptation) comes from a feeling that all-too many of them are basically telling the same story. You’ve generally got the standard origin story which (let’s be honest) basically takes Richard Donner’s Superman: The Movie and pours it into a different color bottle (I say that as a big fan of Spider-Man and Captain America). Then you have the sequels, which are quite often merely a case of escalation and/or the hero dealing with self-doubt often while in combat with a ‘bigger/badder’ version of himself (again, thank you Superman II). But over the last twenty years or so, there have been a handful of high-profile comic book films that have attempted to play around with the formula but have artistically failed anyway. As a rebuttal to the idea that ‘all superhero movies are the same’ as well as a reaffirmation of the idea that ‘it’s not what it’s about, but how it’s about it’, let’s take a look at five comic book adaptations that didn’t play it safe, but didn’t come out on top either.

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Tuesday January 17th, 2012

“The Artist,” “Tinker, Tailor” Top British Academy Film Awards Nominations

By Sean O’Connell

Michel Hazanavicius’ “The Artist” continues its march through the awards season, topping the Orange British Academy Film Awards with 12 nominations including Best Film, Original Screenplay, Original Music, Cinematography, Editing, Make Up and Hair, Costume Design, Sound and Production Design, Director, Leading Actor and Leading Actress.

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Friday December 30th, 2011

Contender Castoffs: What Happened to These 13 Would-Be 2011 Awards Hopefuls?

As 2011 winds to a close and the announcement of Oscar nominations approaches, I thought it might be interesting to catch up with some of the films many thought, at one time or another, would factor into this year’s awards race but never did.

Some screened at festivals in search of a distributor but didn’t find one; others found a distributor, but the distributor decided it lacked the money, manpower or time to mount a campaign this year. Some had distributors before they were in the can and simply were not completed in time to be released this year; others were completed in time to be released this year, but their distributors had their hands full with other contenders and decided to hold them until next year.

It is important to remember that just because a film is not part of this year’s awards race doesn’t mean it won’t be part of next year’s. True, some of these titles will never be heard from again — but others could follow in the footsteps of, say:

  • Crash, which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival in September 2004, at which time it was picked up for U.S. distribution by Lionsgate and held for the following year; was released theatrically in May 2005; and, in March 2006, won the best picture Oscar.
  • The Visitor, which premiered at Toronto in September 2007, at which time it was picked up for U.S. distribution by Overture and held for the following year; was released theatrically in April 2008; and, in February 2009, was represented at the Oscars in the best actor category.
  • Lovely, Still, which premiered at Toronto in September 2008; was not picked up by a distributor until 2010, when Monterey Media decided to take a chance on it; and was released in theaters in September 2010.
  • The Hurt Locker, which premiered at Toronto in September 2008, at which time it was picked up for U.S. distribution by Summit and held for the following year; was released theatrically in June 2009; and, in March 2010, won the best picture Oscar.
  • The DebtEverything Must GoThe First GraderGirlfriendMeek’s CutoffSarah’s KeyTabloidThe Way and The Whistleblower, all of which premiered at Toronto in September 2010; were subsequently picked up by various distributors; and were held for release until 2011.

Without further ado, here is the class of 2011:

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Thursday December 22nd, 2011

“War Horse” UK Premiere to Benefit Foundation of Princes William and Harry

By Sean O’Connell

Steven Spielberg’s “War Horse,” the director’s anticipated adaptation of the Tony-winning stage play, finally opens in theaters on Christmas Day, giving audiences the chance to catch up on the uplifting story of a young farmhand (Jeremy Irvine) and the unbreakable bond he shares with his horse, Joey.

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