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Posts Tagged ‘Woody Allen’

Tuesday October 27th, 2015

‘Star Wars: Episode VII’: The Original ‘Star Wars’ History With Oscar and ‘Annie Hall’

By Patrick Shanley
Managing Editor

With the official trailer for Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens receiving over 13 million views in the first day of its release last Monday, it is safe to assume that full-scale Star Wars hype has settled in. The film, directed by J.J. Abrams, looks poised to break box office records when it finally hits theaters this December, but it may also be a Oscar contender, just as George Lucas’ original film in the iconic sci-fi series was nearly 40 years ago.

Traveling back to 1977, the year Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope (then simply titled Star Wars) was originally released, the landscape of film was far different from today’s plethora of box office franchises. Lucas took audiences to a galaxy far, far away and was rewarded with the highest grossing film ever at that time as well as 10 Oscar nominations, including best picture.

The epic of Luke and Darth Vader has become legendary, but the story of how the film lost out to Woody Allen’s Annie Hall for best picture at the 50th Academy Awards is significantly lesser known.

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Wednesday September 16th, 2015

Space May Be the New Frontier for Oscar Hopefuls

By Patrick Shanley
Managing Editor

There has been a trend towards the stars in the past few years in Hollywood, and Oscar has finally begun to take notice. Films set in outerspace are no longer just the realm of niche science fiction, but rather have begun to get serious awards recognition.

The Martian, the new space epic from director Ridley Scott and star Matt Damon based on the novel by Andy Weir, premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival this past weekend and has high hopes for Oscar gold. Scott has been nominated for best director three times in his career (1991’s Thelma &Louise, 2000’s Gladiator, 2001’s Black Hawk Down) and hopes that his latest will finally earn him the statue.

Space-set films have been getting more respect as potential award season threats, with 2013’s Gravity earning a best director award for Alfonso Cuarón and a best picture nom. The trend is somewhat new, however, as a look back at years past show just how far the genre has come in terms of Oscar recognition.

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Thursday January 1st, 2015

Scott Feinberg’s Top 10 Films of 2014


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

With just hours remaining in 2014, I wanted to document for myself — and share with you — the films that I enjoyed the most this year. I have seen hundreds of titles — on the big screen and on screeners, at festivals and at multiplexes — among them all of the top Oscar contenders, up to and including every film on the documentary and foreign language film shortlists. In other words, I have done my best to be well-versed in what’s out there — but, needless to say, no list of this sort is anything but a subjective exercise for anyone.

It pains me that I do not have room to acknowledge, on the list itself, more of 2014’s extraordinary films (i.e. the 12-year project Boyhood, the acting showcases Birdman and The Imitation Game, the timely Selma and films both profound and moving, such as Citizenfour, Finding Vivian Maier and Leviathan, and funny, such as The Humbling and Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon); performances (i.e. Selma’s David Oyelowo, Still Alice’s Julianne Moore, Get On Up’s Chadwick Boseman, Dear White People’s Tessa Thompson,The Skeleton Twins’ Bill Hader, Fort Bliss’ Michelle Monaghan, The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby’s Jessica Chastain); and scenes (i.e. the silent sparring in Foxcatcher, the highway showdown in A Most Violent Year, the firing of a man for being gay in Love Is Strange, the courtroom speech in Black or White and the pantomimed soccer game in Timbuktu) — so I’ve taken the liberty of doing so here in the intro.

The last thing that I’ll note, for those who primarily follow me for my objective assessments of the awards race, is that the list that the following list and remarks reflect my personal opinions and do/will not in any way impact my projections or analysis on this site, through which I strive above all else to accurately report what has happened and forecast what will happen. My demonstrated ability to do that over the years is what has led many of you to my coverage, and any failure on my part to do that would undoubtedly lead many of you away from it, so you can rest assured that I mean it when I say that one has/will have no bearing on the other.

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Tuesday September 2nd, 2014

Oscar Hopefuls Don’t Need a Boost From Festival Season

 

By Anjelica Oswald
Managing Editor

Telluride is over, Toronto is on its way, awards buzz is growing and the fight is on for Oscar hopefuls. It’s just another fall in the film world.

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Friday May 2nd, 2014

Talking Movies, Episode 3: ‘Marty,’ ‘The Bridge on the River Kwai’ and ‘Ben-Hur’

In Episode 3 of Talking Movies, Scott and I discuss three Best Picture winners from the 1950s. What do these films suggest about the contemporary movie industry, which had to respond to the emergence of television? How did “The Epic” change the standards of production and studio spending? Who were the key players and victims of the Hollywood Blacklist and the House Un-American Activities Committee? What precipitated the fall of the Big Studio, as well as the arrival of Independent Cinema? Listen to a discussion of these topics and many more in Episode 3 of Talking Movies.

~ Talking Movies is a Retro-Reviewer.com podcast series covering classic films from the 20th century. In this episode, our guest co-host is Scott Feinberg, the lead awards analyst for The Hollywood Reporter and the founder/editor-in-chief of ScottFeinberg.com.

Listen to the podcast…

Monday February 3rd, 2014

Santa Barbara Film Fest: Cate Blanchett Adds Another Accolade to ‘Blue Jasmine’ Stockpile


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

The third night of the 29th Santa Barbara International Film Festival was highlighted by the presentation of the fest’s Outstanding Performer of the Year Award to Blue Jasmine‘s Cate Blanchett, the prohibitive favorite to take home the best actress Oscar on March 2. The elegant leading lady, who would have fit in beautifully during any age of cinema history, was previously honored at the fest in 2008, when she received its Modern Master Award. This go-around, her Q&A was moderated by Deadline’s affable awards columnist Pete Hammond and her award itself was presented to her by Rooney Mara, her admirer and costar on Terrence Malick‘s next film.

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Thursday January 16th, 2014

Oscar Nominations by the Numbers: Fun Facts and Shocking Stats


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

For Oscar buffs — read “Oscar geeks” — like me, one of the great thrills of each year’s Academy Awards nominations announcement is the opportunity to dig through the eight-plus decades of Oscar record books and investigate. There’s no way to truly compare the classics of yesteryear with the finest films of today, but in a weird way this allows us to do something like that — and, while that’s not particularly useful, it sure is a blast to do! So, without further ado, here are the fun factoids and shocking stats that I’ve come up with about the new crop of Oscar nominees.

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Tuesday December 31st, 2013

David O. Russell’s Hot Streak

By Mark Pinkert
Contributor

If David O. Russell gets nominated for Best Director this year, he will have accomplished something that Martin Scorsese, Woody Allen, Alfred Hitchcock, Francis Ford Coppola and many other great directors have not–that is, to earn three Best Director nominations in the span of only four years. In fact, only eleven other directors have been on comparable hot streaks in Academy Award history, and only one of those streaks (by Clint Eastwood) has occurred after 1960. (See below for reference.)

This is not a comparison of overall quality or career prolificity (not many can bout with Scorsese, Allen, Hitchcock and Coppola in those categories), but merely a tribute to Russell’s ultra-concentrated efforts in the past four years and a recognition of the difficulty of this feat. It’s also a relevant because it might shed some light on previous Oscar trends and on what we can expect at the 86th Oscars.

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Tuesday December 10th, 2013

Race, Gender, and Sexuality at the Oscars, Part III

By Mark Pinkert
Contributor

* * *

This is the third article in a three-part series.

Though many Academy Award Best Picture nominees contain—or are predominantly about—sex and relationships, very few have been about sex issues in law and politics. In recent years there has been Milk (2008), the biopic of Harvey Milk, a California politician and gay rights activist, and otherwise not much else. Even in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when the AIDS epidemic was a hot button issue, few films of this genre made it to the Best Picture ticket (remember, Philadelphia was snubbed from the category in 1993). Sexual issues topics, though, have been more popular within the documentary medium: there was Common Threads: Stories from the Quilt (1989), which won for Best Documentary, and which was the first AIDS-related film to win an Oscar, the The Times of Harvey Milk (1984), which also won Best Documentary, and How to Survive a Plague (2012), which was nominated for Best Documentary at the 85th Academy Awards earlier this year.

The Oscar race this year, though, does feature an important film about sex issues, Dallas Buyers Club (2013), which will likely make the Best Picture ticket and has a shot to win. Though the sociopolitical scope of this film is generally contained within the Dallas locale of Ron Woodroof (Matthew McConaughey) and his HIV-positive buyers club, the film is quite relevant today. Through the growth of Woodroof—a once outspoken homophobe turned sympathetic activist—we see the real dangers of sex-related stigmata in society.

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Sunday September 22nd, 2013

The 10 Past Winners Most Likely to Be Nominated Again This Year

By Joey Magidson
Film Contributor

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Each year, Oscar voters reward several previously unrecognized talents with their first Academy Award nominations. But they have a habit of filling many if not most of their 20 acting slots with people whom they have previously been nominated. (If you happen to have already won an Oscar? Well, then you are sitting even prettier.)

Why is this the case? That’s probably a question for a psychologist, although my own guess would be that voters are more inclined to check out the work of — and reward — work by quantities who are known and established than who are not.

Regardless, there are, as usual, plenty of previous nominees and winners — actors, actresses, directors, writers, and various behind-the-scenes talent — angling this year to be a part of the Oscar race once again. I have decided to highlight the 10 whom I believe have the best shot at scoring that desired recognition.

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