Telluride: ‘Birdman’ Flies Into Fest, With Slightly Bumpier Landing Than in Venice ... Telluride: A Film Fest That Knows How to Party ... Telluride: ‘Rosewater’ Director Jon Stewart Receives Hero’s Welcome ... Telluride: Benedict Cumberbatch Leads Weinstein’s ‘Imitation Game’ Into Oscar Fray ... Telluride: Fest Kicks Off With ‘Wild,’ Reese Witherspoon Returns to Oscar Discussion ... Talking Movies, Episode 6: ‘Safety Last!,’ ‘The General’ and ‘City Lights’ ... Talking Movies, Episode 5: ‘The Last Picture Show,’ ‘Mean Streets’ and ‘The Conversation’ ... Talking Movies, Episode 4: ‘Bonnie and Clyde,’ ‘Easy Rider’ and ‘The Wild Bunch’ ...
Countdown to Oscars

Posts Tagged ‘Woody Allen’

Friday May 2nd, 2014

Talking Movies, Episode 3: ‘Marty,’ ‘The Bridge on the River Kwai’ and ‘Ben-Hur’

In Episode 3 of Talking Movies, Scott and I discuss three Best Picture winners from the 1950s. What do these films suggest about the contemporary movie industry, which had to respond to the emergence of television? How did “The Epic” change the standards of production and studio spending? Who were the key players and victims of the Hollywood Blacklist and the House Un-American Activities Committee? What precipitated the fall of the Big Studio, as well as the arrival of Independent Cinema? Listen to a discussion of these topics and many more in Episode 3 of Talking Movies.

~ Talking Movies is a Retro-Reviewer.com podcast series covering classic films from the 20th century. In this episode, our guest co-host is Scott Feinberg, the lead awards analyst for The Hollywood Reporter and the founder/editor-in-chief of ScottFeinberg.com.

Listen to the podcast…

Monday February 3rd, 2014

Santa Barbara Film Fest: Cate Blanchett Adds Another Accolade to ‘Blue Jasmine’ Stockpile


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

The third night of the 29th Santa Barbara International Film Festival was highlighted by the presentation of the fest’s Outstanding Performer of the Year Award to Blue Jasmine‘s Cate Blanchett, the prohibitive favorite to take home the best actress Oscar on March 2. The elegant leading lady, who would have fit in beautifully during any age of cinema history, was previously honored at the fest in 2008, when she received its Modern Master Award. This go-around, her Q&A was moderated by Deadline’s affable awards columnist Pete Hammond and her award itself was presented to her by Rooney Mara, her admirer and costar on Terrence Malick‘s next film.

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Thursday January 16th, 2014

Oscar Nominations by the Numbers: Fun Facts and Shocking Stats


By Scott Feinberg
The Hollywood Reporter

For Oscar buffs — read “Oscar geeks” — like me, one of the great thrills of each year’s Academy Awards nominations announcement is the opportunity to dig through the eight-plus decades of Oscar record books and investigate. There’s no way to truly compare the classics of yesteryear with the finest films of today, but in a weird way this allows us to do something like that — and, while that’s not particularly useful, it sure is a blast to do! So, without further ado, here are the fun factoids and shocking stats that I’ve come up with about the new crop of Oscar nominees.

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Tuesday December 31st, 2013

David O. Russell’s Hot Streak

By Mark Pinkert
Contributor

If David O. Russell gets nominated for Best Director this year, he will have accomplished something that Martin Scorsese, Woody Allen, Alfred Hitchcock, Francis Ford Coppola and many other great directors have not–that is, to earn three Best Director nominations in the span of only four years. In fact, only eleven other directors have been on comparable hot streaks in Academy Award history, and only one of those streaks (by Clint Eastwood) has occurred after 1960. (See below for reference.)

This is not a comparison of overall quality or career prolificity (not many can bout with Scorsese, Allen, Hitchcock and Coppola in those categories), but merely a tribute to Russell’s ultra-concentrated efforts in the past four years and a recognition of the difficulty of this feat. It’s also a relevant because it might shed some light on previous Oscar trends and on what we can expect at the 86th Oscars.

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Tuesday December 10th, 2013

Race, Gender, and Sexuality at the Oscars, Part III

By Mark Pinkert
Contributor

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This is the third article in a three-part series.

Though many Academy Award Best Picture nominees contain—or are predominantly about—sex and relationships, very few have been about sex issues in law and politics. In recent years there has been Milk (2008), the biopic of Harvey Milk, a California politician and gay rights activist, and otherwise not much else. Even in the late 1980s and early 1990s, when the AIDS epidemic was a hot button issue, few films of this genre made it to the Best Picture ticket (remember, Philadelphia was snubbed from the category in 1993). Sexual issues topics, though, have been more popular within the documentary medium: there was Common Threads: Stories from the Quilt (1989), which won for Best Documentary, and which was the first AIDS-related film to win an Oscar, the The Times of Harvey Milk (1984), which also won Best Documentary, and How to Survive a Plague (2012), which was nominated for Best Documentary at the 85th Academy Awards earlier this year.

The Oscar race this year, though, does feature an important film about sex issues, Dallas Buyers Club (2013), which will likely make the Best Picture ticket and has a shot to win. Though the sociopolitical scope of this film is generally contained within the Dallas locale of Ron Woodroof (Matthew McConaughey) and his HIV-positive buyers club, the film is quite relevant today. Through the growth of Woodroof—a once outspoken homophobe turned sympathetic activist—we see the real dangers of sex-related stigmata in society.

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Sunday September 22nd, 2013

The 10 Past Winners Most Likely to Be Nominated Again This Year

By Joey Magidson
Film Contributor

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Each year, Oscar voters reward several previously unrecognized talents with their first Academy Award nominations. But they have a habit of filling many if not most of their 20 acting slots with people whom they have previously been nominated. (If you happen to have already won an Oscar? Well, then you are sitting even prettier.)

Why is this the case? That’s probably a question for a psychologist, although my own guess would be that voters are more inclined to check out the work of — and reward — work by quantities who are known and established than who are not.

Regardless, there are, as usual, plenty of previous nominees and winners — actors, actresses, directors, writers, and various behind-the-scenes talent — angling this year to be a part of the Oscar race once again. I have decided to highlight the 10 whom I believe have the best shot at scoring that desired recognition.

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Friday September 20th, 2013

The Great Migration of Movie Stars… to Television?!

By Doreen Alexander Child
Contributor

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Just a generation ago it would have been unimaginable, but the fact of the matter is this: since the arrival of premium cable and the rise of HBO about 30 years ago, television has provided quality entertainment on a more consistent basis than movies. This has never been more true than it is today, with the movies dominated by mindless remakes, sequels and adaptations, while TV offers the likes of not only HBO but also AMC, Showtime and now even streaming alternatives like Netflix, all of which proudly air original and edgy content of the sort that one used to find at the cineplex before the studios were swallowed by profit-obsessed conglomerates. Now, not only viewers look at TV differently — but so, too, do talent.

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Monday September 16th, 2013

Cate Blanchett and the Unusual Jump from Supporting to Lead

By Joey Magidson
Film Contributor
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If there’s one Oscar category where it’s safe to say there’s already a clear frontrunner at this point, it’s best actress. That race is currently looking mostly like a battle for second place, with Cate Blanchett sitting way out front for her role in Woody Allen’s Blue Jasmine. Should she end up holding on, it would make her a two-time Oscar winner. (She won nine years ago for her portrayal of Katharine Hepburn in The Aviator.) This, however, would be her first best actress prize.

39 men and women have been honored with more than one acting Oscar. Of them, only 11 have won in both acting categories in which they were eligible — in other words, best actor and best supporting actor for men and best actress and best supporting actress for women. Blanchett would become only be the sixth man or woman to ever win first in a supporting category and then win again later in a leading category.

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Tuesday February 26th, 2013

The Best Broadcast Pilot Orders of the 2013-2014 Season: ABC and Fox

By Rachel Bennett
Television Editor & Columnist

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It’s pilot season, which means your favorite out-of-work TV actors, actresses, creators and writers are getting a chance to return to the small screen once more.

Although we have yet to know what new series we’ll see next year, the networks have been busy selecting projects to consider for their schedules. So far, almost 100 scripts have been chosen, and audiences will only get to see a handful actually come to fruition.

Several are duds, but there are a few promising prospects that I hope network executives will keep around for the 2013-2014 season — even if it means they have to cancel old favorites to make room (just keep Parks and Recreation, OK, NBC?).

Check out my choices for the best prospective ABC and Fox pilots, and read my selections for NBC and CBS if you missed them yesterday:

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Friday February 1st, 2013

The Top 10 Actors Turned Directors

By Joey Magidson
Film Contributor

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I’ve always had a soft spot for films that are directed by actors. In one of my recent pieces, I spoke about how the Academy looks at actors who direct. Now, I’ll be continuing my interest by focusing in on which of these multi-hyphenates are the best at what they do.

By and large, the films that actors make when they choose directorial projects have some sort of significance for them or at least play to their strengths, so disasters are few and far between. This makes it a lot of fun to celebrate the best of the bunch, since I’m able to draw from a larger pool than you normally can when looking at one particular type of filmmaker.

I take some comfort in knowing that most films directed by actors tend to be at least decent, if not better. I see almost 300 movies in a given year (in 2012 I saw 290 in total), so I undoubtedly see a lot of garbage to go along with the gems, but the flicks that actor-directors put out almost never turn out terrible.

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